3 Copy edits and formatting.
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At least in the U.S.:

  • Police get involved when they feel like it, or when a superior officer orders them to.
  • Police have authority to investigate crimes, stop crimes in progress, and cite or arrest people they have probable cause to believe have committed a crime.
  • Police can lie in the course of their official duties. Police don’t have to tell you anything unless they are detaining or arresting you, in which case they only have to tell you that. In many states nobody but sworn officers of the law or court can even see reports or information until the police have closed any investigation they have decided to pursue. They close investigations when they feel like it or when a superior officer orders them to.

We don’t offer legal advice on this site. But I’ll point out that police and lawyers broadly agree that, legally, the best advice is to never talk to police. (Just Googlegoogle “Don’t talk to police…” to get started….)

At least in the U.S.:

  • Police get involved when they feel like it, or when a superior officer orders them to.
  • Police have authority to investigate crimes, stop crimes in progress, and cite or arrest people they have probable cause to believe have committed a crime.
  • Police can lie in the course of their official duties. Police don’t have to tell you anything unless they are detaining or arresting you, in which case they only have to tell you that. In many states nobody but sworn officers of the law or court can even see reports or information until the police have closed any investigation they have decided to pursue. They close investigations when they feel like it or when a superior officer orders them to.

We don’t offer legal advice on this site. But I’ll point out that police and lawyers broadly agree that, legally, the best advice is to never talk to police. (Just Google “Don’t talk to police…” to get started….)

At least in the U.S.:

  • Police get involved when they feel like it, or when a superior officer orders them to.
  • Police have authority to investigate crimes, stop crimes in progress, and cite or arrest people they have probable cause to believe have committed a crime.
  • Police can lie in the course of their official duties. Police don’t have to tell you anything unless they are detaining or arresting you, in which case they only have to tell you that. In many states nobody but sworn officers of the law or court can even see reports or information until the police have closed any investigation they have decided to pursue. They close investigations when they feel like it or when a superior officer orders them to.

We don’t offer legal advice on this site. But I’ll point out that police and lawyers broadly agree that, legally, the best advice is to never talk to police. (Just google “Don’t talk to police…” to get started….)

2 Copy edits and formatting.
source | link

At least in the U.S.:

Police get involved when they feel like it, or when a superior officer orders them to.

Police have authority to investigate crimes, stop crimes in progress, and cite or arrest people they have probable cause to believe have committed a crime.

Police can lie in the course of their official duties. Police don't have to tell you anything unless they are detaining or arresting you, in which case they only have to tell you that. In many states nobody but sworn officers of the law or court can even see reports or information until the police have closed any investigation they have decided to pursue. They close investigations when they feel like it or when a superior officer orders them to.

  • Police get involved when they feel like it, or when a superior officer orders them to.
  • Police have authority to investigate crimes, stop crimes in progress, and cite or arrest people they have probable cause to believe have committed a crime.
  • Police can lie in the course of their official duties. Police don’t have to tell you anything unless they are detaining or arresting you, in which case they only have to tell you that. In many states nobody but sworn officers of the law or court can even see reports or information until the police have closed any investigation they have decided to pursue. They close investigations when they feel like it or when a superior officer orders them to.

We don'tdon’t offer legal advice hereon this site. But I'llBut I’ll point out that police and lawyers broadly agree that, legally, the best advice is to never talk to police.  (Just google "don'tGoogle “Don’t talk to police"police…” to get started...started….)

At least in the U.S.:

Police get involved when they feel like it, or when a superior officer orders them to.

Police have authority to investigate crimes, stop crimes in progress, and cite or arrest people they have probable cause to believe have committed a crime.

Police can lie in the course of their official duties. Police don't have to tell you anything unless they are detaining or arresting you, in which case they only have to tell you that. In many states nobody but sworn officers of the law or court can even see reports or information until the police have closed any investigation they have decided to pursue. They close investigations when they feel like it or when a superior officer orders them to.

We don't offer legal advice here. But I'll point out that police and lawyers broadly agree that, legally, the best advice is to never talk to police.  (Just google "don't talk to police" to get started....)

At least in the U.S.:

  • Police get involved when they feel like it, or when a superior officer orders them to.
  • Police have authority to investigate crimes, stop crimes in progress, and cite or arrest people they have probable cause to believe have committed a crime.
  • Police can lie in the course of their official duties. Police don’t have to tell you anything unless they are detaining or arresting you, in which case they only have to tell you that. In many states nobody but sworn officers of the law or court can even see reports or information until the police have closed any investigation they have decided to pursue. They close investigations when they feel like it or when a superior officer orders them to.

We don’t offer legal advice on this site. But I’ll point out that police and lawyers broadly agree that, legally, the best advice is to never talk to police. (Just Google “Don’t talk to police…” to get started….)

1
source | link

At least in the U.S.:

Police get involved when they feel like it, or when a superior officer orders them to.

Police have authority to investigate crimes, stop crimes in progress, and cite or arrest people they have probable cause to believe have committed a crime.

Police can lie in the course of their official duties. Police don't have to tell you anything unless they are detaining or arresting you, in which case they only have to tell you that. In many states nobody but sworn officers of the law or court can even see reports or information until the police have closed any investigation they have decided to pursue. They close investigations when they feel like it or when a superior officer orders them to.

We don't offer legal advice here. But I'll point out that police and lawyers broadly agree that, legally, the best advice is to never talk to police. (Just google "don't talk to police" to get started....)