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One can observe who files a lawsuit (or sends a cease-and-desist letter (or files a lawsuit) for copyright infringement, and if they're successful in showing they have a copyrightthe letter recipient (or have evidence convincing to thecourt or defendant) they have a copyright. That's the most reliable way to find out. Unfortunately, there is no central registry of copyright transfers.

In such a case, the defendant has a better chance (esp. against willful infringement claims) if they made a reasonable effort to determine who the copyright holder most likely is, and licensed/bought rights from that party for at least some fee. If people are being reasonable (not a safe assumption) and a mistake was made in choosing who to license from, it can often be worked out in settlement as the claimant presents their basis and the retrievable history becomes clearer.

One can observe who files a lawsuit (or sends a cease-and-desist letter) for copyright infringement, and if they're successful in showing they have a copyright (or have evidence convincing to the defendant). That's the most reliable way to find out. Unfortunately, there is no central registry of copyright transfers.

In such a case, the defendant has a better chance (esp. against willful infringement claims) if they made a reasonable effort to determine who the copyright holder most likely is, and licensed/bought rights from that party for at least some fee. If people are being reasonable (not a safe assumption) and a mistake was made in choosing who to license from, it can often be worked out in settlement as the claimant presents their basis and the retrievable history becomes clearer.

One can observe who sends a cease-and-desist letter (or files a lawsuit) for copyright infringement, and if they're successful in showing the letter recipient (or court or defendant) they have a copyright. That's the most reliable way to find out. Unfortunately, there is no central registry of copyright transfers.

In such a case, the defendant has a better chance (esp. against willful infringement claims) if they made a reasonable effort to determine who the copyright holder most likely is, and licensed/bought rights from that party for at least some fee. If people are being reasonable (not a safe assumption) and a mistake was made in choosing who to license from, it can often be worked out in settlement as the claimant presents their basis and the retrievable history becomes clearer.

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source | link

One can observe who files a lawsuit (or sends a cease-and-desist letter) for copyright infringement, and if they're successful in showing they have a copyright (or have evidence convincing to the defendant). That's the most reliable way to find out. Unfortunately, there is no central registry of copyright transfers.

In such a case, the defendant has a better chance (esp. against willful infringement claims) if they made a reasonable effort to determine who the copyright holder most likely is, and licensed/bought rights from that party for at least some fee. If people are being reasonable (not a safe assumption) and a mistake was made in choosing who to license from, it can often be worked out in settlement as the claimant presents their basis and the retrievable history becomes clearer.