2 clarify comparative context and refer to related Florida provisions
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The landlord may, in fact, regulate how his or her property is modified, such as the installation of additional locks fastened to the structure. However, they cannot prohibit tenants from adding temporary locking devices, such as levers or wedges applied to the hold the door shut against intruders. There are hundreds of such devices on the market, which are similar to items sometimes carried as "travellers'"travelers' locks", for use in dodgy hotel rooms.

As for the landlord's putativealleged "right to enter at any time and for any purpose", they can clearly show that you consented to it in the agreement and, should it come to this, you would have to prove that including such consent was "unconscionable", or unenforceable, or a "prohibited provision", under Florida law.

Clearly there are implied limits to "any purpose", where you cannot be presumed to have granted permission for them to commit a criminal act against you or your property, or in violation of your "right to privacy", among other things.

The statute on "landlord right of entry" is permissive, not prohibitive. It says "landlord may enter" under the various listed conditions, but does not say "may ONLY enter" under such conditions. If you look in your rental agreement and find "quiet enjoyment" as an obligation of the landlord, you may certainly attempt to enforce that against their uninvited entry to your home.

For comparison, some other states have laws that specifically prohibit the landlord from entering for any reason, without consent of a tenant, except as specifically provided in the statute (e.g., in an emergency). Some states also authorize entry after giving reasonable notice, whether or not the tenant consents. Florida law also authorizes such entry under limited circumstances, to the extent it's relevant to your question.

The landlord may, in fact, regulate how his or her property is modified, such as the installation of additional locks fastened to the structure. However, they cannot prohibit tenants from adding temporary locking devices, such as levers or wedges applied to the hold the door shut against intruders. There are hundreds of such devices on the market, which are similar to items sometimes carried as "travellers' locks", for use in dodgy hotel rooms.

As for the landlord's putative "right to enter at any time and for any purpose", they can clearly show that you consented to it in the agreement and, should it come to this, you would have to prove that including such consent was "unconscionable", or unenforceable, or a "prohibited provision", under Florida law.

Clearly there are implied limits to "any purpose", where you cannot be presumed to have granted permission for them to commit a criminal act against you or your property, or in violation of your "right to privacy", among other things.

The statute on "landlord right of entry" is permissive, not prohibitive. It says "landlord may enter" under the various listed conditions, but does not say "may ONLY enter" under such conditions. If you look in your rental agreement and find "quiet enjoyment" as an obligation of the landlord, you may certainly attempt to enforce that against their uninvited entry to your home.

The landlord may, in fact, regulate how his or her property is modified, such as the installation of additional locks fastened to the structure. However, they cannot prohibit tenants from adding temporary locking devices, such as levers or wedges applied to the hold the door shut against intruders. There are hundreds of such devices on the market, which are similar to items sometimes carried as "travelers' locks", for use in dodgy hotel rooms.

As for the landlord's alleged "right to enter at any time and for any purpose", they can clearly show that you consented to it in the agreement and, should it come to this, you would have to prove that including such consent was "unconscionable", or unenforceable, or a "prohibited provision", under Florida law.

Clearly there are implied limits to "any purpose", where you cannot be presumed to have granted permission for them to commit a criminal act against you or your property, or in violation of your "right to privacy", among other things.

The statute on "landlord right of entry" is permissive, not prohibitive. It says "landlord may enter" under the various listed conditions, but does not say "may ONLY enter" under such conditions. If you look in your rental agreement and find "quiet enjoyment" as an obligation of the landlord, you may certainly attempt to enforce that against their uninvited entry to your home.

For comparison, some other states have laws that specifically prohibit the landlord from entering for any reason, without consent of a tenant, except as specifically provided in the statute (e.g., in an emergency). Some states also authorize entry after giving reasonable notice, whether or not the tenant consents. Florida law also authorizes such entry under limited circumstances, to the extent it's relevant to your question.

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The landlord may, in fact, regulate how his or her property is modified, such as the installation of additional locks fastened to the structure. However, they cannot prohibit tenants from adding temporary locking devices, such as levers or wedges applied to the hold the door shut against intruders. There are hundreds of such devices on the market, which are similar to items sometimes carried as "travellers' locks", for use in dodgy hotel rooms.

As for the landlord's putative "right to enter at any time and for any purpose", they can clearly show that you consented to it in the agreement and, should it come to this, you would have to prove that including such consent was "unconscionable", or unenforceable, or a "prohibited provision", under Florida law.

Clearly there are implied limits to "any purpose", where you cannot be presumed to have granted permission for them to commit a criminal act against you or your property, or in violation of your "right to privacy", among other things.

The statute on "landlord right of entry" is permissive, not prohibitive. It says "landlord may enter" under the various listed conditions, but does not say "may ONLY enter" under such conditions. If you look in your rental agreement and find "quiet enjoyment" as an obligation of the landlord, you may certainly attempt to enforce that against their uninvited entry to your home.