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Dave and Bob co-found a company together and both sign a shareholders agreement.They then work together on the company full-time for a year.

Dave is then accused by Bob of breaching the agreement by starting a side project. Dave disagrees that he breached the agreement, but still wants the dispute resolved as he believes in the company and wants to move on from the issue.

Bob proposes a resolution to the dispute: Dave meets certain deadlines to accelerate the progress of their company, in exchange for this Bob will drop the issue. It's all things Dave will need to do eventually anyway, so they verbally agree and Dave believes all is well again.

A week later Bob comes back to Dave and says that he has changed his mind. Bob now wants Dave to sign some ownership of his side project over to their company. Dave is initially hesitant, but Dave still believes in their company, so agrees to give their company 5% ownership of the side project. The paperwork is drafted up and emailed out, and again Dave believes all is sorted.

A few weeks go by and Bob still hasn't made an effort to confirm that he is happy with the drafted paperwork, and nothing has been signed. At this point Dave gets fed up with with Bob and decides he has had enough. Dave leaves the company, remaining only as a shareholder, and gets a full-time job elsewhere.

A couple of months go by and then Dave receives a message from Bob saying that because of the dispute, he wants to take Dave to court in an attempt to take Dave's shares back by force and take full ownership of the side project that caused it. Dave informs Bob that he is happy to sell his shares back, as he put in the work to build the company. Dave and Bob both put offers on the table, but cannot agree to an amount.

It reaches the point where Bob and Dave cannot agree and going to court is the next step.

At each stage, Dave has made full effort to resolve the dispute, however Bob has initially verbally agreed, but then changed his mind. How is this viewed in court?

Dave is concerned that going to court could be expensive, but doesn't want to settle for a share value that doesn't represent the work put in.

EDIT: To clarify, the proposed resolution for Dave to sign over 5% ownership of the side-project to their company was decided and agreed upon in a meeting between Bob, Dave and the company lawyer

Dave and Bob co-found a company together and both sign a shareholders agreement.They then work together on the company full-time for a year.

Dave is then accused by Bob of breaching the agreement by starting a side project. Dave disagrees that he breached the agreement, but still wants the dispute resolved as he believes in the company and wants to move on from the issue.

Bob proposes a resolution to the dispute: Dave meets certain deadlines to accelerate the progress of their company, in exchange for this Bob will drop the issue. It's all things Dave will need to do eventually anyway, so they verbally agree and Dave believes all is well again.

A week later Bob comes back to Dave and says that he has changed his mind. Bob now wants Dave to sign some ownership of his side project over to their company. Dave is initially hesitant, but Dave still believes in their company, so agrees to give their company 5% ownership of the side project. The paperwork is drafted up and emailed out, and again Dave believes all is sorted.

A few weeks go by and Bob still hasn't made an effort to confirm that he is happy with the drafted paperwork, and nothing has been signed. At this point Dave gets fed up with with Bob and decides he has had enough. Dave leaves the company, remaining only as a shareholder, and gets a full-time job elsewhere.

A couple of months go by and then Dave receives a message from Bob saying that because of the dispute, he wants to take Dave to court in an attempt to take Dave's shares back by force and take full ownership of the side project that caused it. Dave informs Bob that he is happy to sell his shares back, as he put in the work to build the company. Dave and Bob both put offers on the table, but cannot agree to an amount.

It reaches the point where Bob and Dave cannot agree and going to court is the next step.

At each stage, Dave has made full effort to resolve the dispute, however Bob has initially verbally agreed, but then changed his mind. How is this viewed in court?

Dave is concerned that going to court could be expensive, but doesn't want to settle for a share value that doesn't represent the work put in.

Dave and Bob co-found a company together and both sign a shareholders agreement.They then work together on the company full-time for a year.

Dave is then accused by Bob of breaching the agreement by starting a side project. Dave disagrees that he breached the agreement, but still wants the dispute resolved as he believes in the company and wants to move on from the issue.

Bob proposes a resolution to the dispute: Dave meets certain deadlines to accelerate the progress of their company, in exchange for this Bob will drop the issue. It's all things Dave will need to do eventually anyway, so they verbally agree and Dave believes all is well again.

A week later Bob comes back to Dave and says that he has changed his mind. Bob now wants Dave to sign some ownership of his side project over to their company. Dave is initially hesitant, but Dave still believes in their company, so agrees to give their company 5% ownership of the side project. The paperwork is drafted up and emailed out, and again Dave believes all is sorted.

A few weeks go by and Bob still hasn't made an effort to confirm that he is happy with the drafted paperwork, and nothing has been signed. At this point Dave gets fed up with with Bob and decides he has had enough. Dave leaves the company, remaining only as a shareholder, and gets a full-time job elsewhere.

A couple of months go by and then Dave receives a message from Bob saying that because of the dispute, he wants to take Dave to court in an attempt to take Dave's shares back by force and take full ownership of the side project that caused it. Dave informs Bob that he is happy to sell his shares back, as he put in the work to build the company. Dave and Bob both put offers on the table, but cannot agree to an amount.

It reaches the point where Bob and Dave cannot agree and going to court is the next step.

At each stage, Dave has made full effort to resolve the dispute, however Bob has initially verbally agreed, but then changed his mind. How is this viewed in court?

Dave is concerned that going to court could be expensive, but doesn't want to settle for a share value that doesn't represent the work put in.

EDIT: To clarify, the proposed resolution for Dave to sign over 5% ownership of the side-project to their company was decided and agreed upon in a meeting between Bob, Dave and the company lawyer

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Going to court after agreeing to multiple dispute resolutions

Dave and Bob co-found a company together and both sign a shareholders agreement.They then work together on the company full-time for a year.

Dave is then accused by Bob of breaching the agreement by starting a side project. Dave disagrees that he breached the agreement, but still wants the dispute resolved as he believes in the company and wants to move on from the issue.

Bob proposes a resolution to the dispute: Dave meets certain deadlines to accelerate the progress of their company, in exchange for this Bob will drop the issue. It's all things Dave will need to do eventually anyway, so they verbally agree and Dave believes all is well again.

A week later Bob comes back to Dave and says that he has changed his mind. Bob now wants Dave to sign some ownership of his side project over to their company. Dave is initially hesitant, but Dave still believes in their company, so agrees to give their company 5% ownership of the side project. The paperwork is drafted up and emailed out, and again Dave believes all is sorted.

A few weeks go by and Bob still hasn't made an effort to confirm that he is happy with the drafted paperwork, and nothing has been signed. At this point Dave gets fed up with with Bob and decides he has had enough. Dave leaves the company, remaining only as a shareholder, and gets a full-time job elsewhere.

A couple of months go by and then Dave receives a message from Bob saying that because of the dispute, he wants to take Dave to court in an attempt to take Dave's shares back by force and take full ownership of the side project that caused it. Dave informs Bob that he is happy to sell his shares back, as he put in the work to build the company. Dave and Bob both put offers on the table, but cannot agree to an amount.

It reaches the point where Bob and Dave cannot agree and going to court is the next step.

At each stage, Dave has made full effort to resolve the dispute, however Bob has initially verbally agreed, but then changed his mind. How is this viewed in court?

Dave is concerned that going to court could be expensive, but doesn't want to settle for a share value that doesn't represent the work put in.