Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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What can we do to dismiss such report? Does she just show up at a local police department telling them that she's fine and it was her own decision?

In short, yes. She shows up at a local police station, tells her side of the story including the whole bit about things getting destroyed and her getting kicked out, cites the missing persons report, and make it clear that she's not missing but an independent adult who is free and making her own decisions. Since she's over 18, she can do that. (Bringing proof of age might be helpful.) The mystery of the missing person will be considered solved from the police side. She does not have to give a specific address where she's living, just convince the officer that she's OK and making an intentional decision to create distance between herself and her mother.

She could also try calling (the same local station which is convenient to her current location) before showing up to see if that satisfies the officer, and only go in if needed.

Would I get in trouble for being in a relationship with her daughter since I was 20 and she was 16? We had never met in person until now, to avoid any trouble.

Shouldn't be a problem, as long as it's a mutually willing (non-coercive) relationship.

Her mother said the police also wanted to talk to me separately. I do not want to get involved in this at all. Can I reject it?

Yes, you can reject it. You do not have to answer ANY question a police officer asks; you have the right to remain silent and/or to say only "I have the right to remain silent." To reduce the probability that they'll even ask questions, you might prefer not accompanying your girlfriend when she goes to clear the missing persons report, if she goes in-person. This adds more weight to her assertion that she's going there to clear it of her own free will, not because you're forcing her.

What can we do to dismiss such report? Does she just show up at a local police department telling them that she's fine and it was her own decision?

In short, yes. She shows up at a local police station, tells her side of the story including the whole bit about things getting destroyed and her getting kicked out, cites the missing persons report, and make it clear that she's not missing but an independent adult who is free and making her own decisions. Since she's over 18, she can do that. (Bringing proof of age might be helpful.) The mystery of the missing person will be considered solved from the police side. She does not have to give a specific address where she's living, just convince the officer that she's OK and making an intentional decision to create distance between herself and her mother.

She could also try calling (the same local station which is convenient to her current location) before showing up to see if that satisfies the officer, and only go in if needed.

Would I get in trouble for being in a relationship with her daughter since I was 20 and she was 16? We had never met in person until now, to avoid any trouble.

Shouldn't be a problem, as long as it's a mutually willing (non-coercive) relationship.

Her mother said the police also wanted to talk to me separately. I do not want to get involved in this at all. Can I reject it?

Yes, you can reject it. You do not have to answer ANY question a police officer asks; you have the right to remain silent. To reduce the probability that they'll even ask questions, you might prefer not accompanying your girlfriend when she goes to clear the missing persons report, if she goes in-person. This adds more weight to her assertion that she's going there to clear it of her own free will, not because you're forcing her.

What can we do to dismiss such report? Does she just show up at a local police department telling them that she's fine and it was her own decision?

In short, yes. She shows up at a local police station, tells her side of the story including the whole bit about things getting destroyed and her getting kicked out, cites the missing persons report, and make it clear that she's not missing but an independent adult who is free and making her own decisions. Since she's over 18, she can do that. (Bringing proof of age might be helpful.) The mystery of the missing person will be considered solved from the police side. She does not have to give a specific address where she's living, just convince the officer that she's OK and making an intentional decision to create distance between herself and her mother.

She could also try calling (the same local station which is convenient to her current location) before showing up to see if that satisfies the officer, and only go in if needed.

Would I get in trouble for being in a relationship with her daughter since I was 20 and she was 16? We had never met in person until now, to avoid any trouble.

Shouldn't be a problem, as long as it's a mutually willing (non-coercive) relationship.

Her mother said the police also wanted to talk to me separately. I do not want to get involved in this at all. Can I reject it?

Yes, you can reject it. You do not have to answer ANY question a police officer asks; you have the right to remain silent and/or to say only "I have the right to remain silent." To reduce the probability that they'll even ask questions, you might prefer not accompanying your girlfriend when she goes to clear the missing persons report, if she goes in-person. This adds more weight to her assertion that she's going there to clear it of her own free will, not because you're forcing her.

2 added 514 characters in body
source | link

What can we do to dismiss such report? Does she just show up at a local police department telling them that she's fine and it was her own decision?

In short, yes. She shows up at a local police station, tells her side of the story including the whole bit about things getting destroyed and her getting kicked out, cites the missing persons report, and make it clear that she's not missing but an independent adult who is free and making her own decisions. Since she's over 18, she can do that. (Bringing proof of age might be helpful.) The mystery of the missing person will be considered solved from the police side. She does not have to give a specific address where she's living, just convince the officer that she's OK and making an intentional decision to create distance between herself and her mother.

She could also try calling (the same local station which is convenient to her current location) before showing up to see if that satisfies the officer, and only go in if needed.

Would I get in trouble for being in a relationship with her daughter since I was 20 and she was 16? We had never met in person until now, to avoid any trouble.

Shouldn't be a problem, as long as it's a mutually willing (non-coercive) relationship.

Her mother said the police also wanted to talk to me separately. I do not want to get involved in this at all. Can I reject it?

Yes, you can reject it. You do not have to answer ANY question a police officer asks; you have the right to remain silent. To reduce the probability that they'll even ask questions, you might prefer not accompanying your girlfriend when she goes to clear the missing persons report, if she goes in-person. This adds more weight to her assertion that she's going there to clear it of her own free will, not because you're forcing her.

What can we do to dismiss such report? Does she just show up at a local police department telling them that she's fine and it was her own decision?

In short, yes. She shows up at a local police station, tells her side of the story including the whole bit about things getting destroyed and her getting kicked out, cites the missing persons report, and make it clear that she's not missing but an independent adult who is free and making her own decisions. Since she's over 18, she can do that. (Bringing proof of age might be helpful.) The mystery of the missing person will be considered solved from the police side. She does not have to give a specific address where she's living, just convince the officer that she's OK and making an intentional decision to create distance between herself and her mother.

She could also try calling (the same local station which is convenient to her current location) before showing up to see if that satisfies the officer, and only go in if needed.

Would I get in trouble for being in a relationship with her daughter since I was 20 and she was 16? We had never met in person until now, to avoid any trouble.

Shouldn't be a problem, as long as it's a mutually willing (non-coercive) relationship.

What can we do to dismiss such report? Does she just show up at a local police department telling them that she's fine and it was her own decision?

In short, yes. She shows up at a local police station, tells her side of the story including the whole bit about things getting destroyed and her getting kicked out, cites the missing persons report, and make it clear that she's not missing but an independent adult who is free and making her own decisions. Since she's over 18, she can do that. (Bringing proof of age might be helpful.) The mystery of the missing person will be considered solved from the police side. She does not have to give a specific address where she's living, just convince the officer that she's OK and making an intentional decision to create distance between herself and her mother.

She could also try calling (the same local station which is convenient to her current location) before showing up to see if that satisfies the officer, and only go in if needed.

Would I get in trouble for being in a relationship with her daughter since I was 20 and she was 16? We had never met in person until now, to avoid any trouble.

Shouldn't be a problem, as long as it's a mutually willing (non-coercive) relationship.

Her mother said the police also wanted to talk to me separately. I do not want to get involved in this at all. Can I reject it?

Yes, you can reject it. You do not have to answer ANY question a police officer asks; you have the right to remain silent. To reduce the probability that they'll even ask questions, you might prefer not accompanying your girlfriend when she goes to clear the missing persons report, if she goes in-person. This adds more weight to her assertion that she's going there to clear it of her own free will, not because you're forcing her.

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What can we do to dismiss such report? Does she just show up at a local police department telling them that she's fine and it was her own decision?

In short, yes. She shows up at a local police station, tells her side of the story including the whole bit about things getting destroyed and her getting kicked out, cites the missing persons report, and make it clear that she's not missing but an independent adult who is free and making her own decisions. Since she's over 18, she can do that. (Bringing proof of age might be helpful.) The mystery of the missing person will be considered solved from the police side. She does not have to give a specific address where she's living, just convince the officer that she's OK and making an intentional decision to create distance between herself and her mother.

She could also try calling (the same local station which is convenient to her current location) before showing up to see if that satisfies the officer, and only go in if needed.

Would I get in trouble for being in a relationship with her daughter since I was 20 and she was 16? We had never met in person until now, to avoid any trouble.

Shouldn't be a problem, as long as it's a mutually willing (non-coercive) relationship.