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Patents cover specific structures or methods. Regarding patents, the question is whether or not you will use, sell, offer for sale, make, or import something that has the claimed structure or performs the claimed steps. If a patent is specific to the hardware, you are just using off the shelf hardware so a hardware-only patent is not an issue for you. If a patent covers the hardware and software meaning together they have a novel structure of perform novel steps, you might also be ok unless the hardware plus your software has the same patented structure or performs the same steps. If the combination of their hardware and your software does something different than what their hardware and their hardware does, you probably will not be stepping on their patents.

It is possible that the original product comes with a shrink-wrap license or some other restriction you have implicitly agreed to regarding the allowed usage of the product. It is possible that to replace their software you need to violate some DRM system. Otherwise the "intended use" is not relevant.

Regarding the idea that they may be motivated to come after you because you took bread from their mouths; it seems that your thing requires their thing and if you did make and sell 100 of your things you would have bought 100 of their things and they have not been deprived of revenue. That assumes their software and software are not sold independently.

Regarding just doing something for you own use, patent laws do not have a "fair use" provision like copyright laws. Of course no one is going to bother you but someone using, making, etc. it for yourselfthemselves can still be patent infringement.

Patents cover specific structures or methods. Regarding patents, the question is whether or not you will use, sell, offer for sale, make, or import something that has the claimed structure or performs the claimed steps. If a patent is specific to the hardware, you are just using off the shelf hardware so a hardware-only patent is not an issue for you. If a patent covers the hardware and software meaning together they have a novel structure of perform novel steps, you might also be ok unless the hardware plus your software has the same patented structure or performs the same steps. If the combination of their hardware and your software does something different than what their hardware and their hardware does, you probably will not be stepping on their patents.

It is possible that the original product comes with a shrink-wrap license or some other restriction you have implicitly agreed to regarding the allowed usage of the product. It is possible that to replace their software you need to violate some DRM system. Otherwise the "intended use" is not relevant.

Regarding the idea that they may be motivated to come after you because you took bread from their mouths; it seems that your thing requires their thing and if you did make and sell 100 of your things you would have bought 100 of their things and they have not been deprived of revenue. That assumes their software and software are not sold independently.

Regarding just doing something for you own use, patent laws do not have a "fair use" provision like copyright laws. Of course no one is going to bother you but using it for yourself can still be patent infringement.

Patents cover specific structures or methods. Regarding patents, the question is whether or not you will use, sell, offer for sale, make, or import something that has the claimed structure or performs the claimed steps. If a patent is specific to the hardware, you are just using off the shelf hardware so a hardware-only patent is not an issue for you. If a patent covers the hardware and software meaning together they have a novel structure of perform novel steps, you might also be ok unless the hardware plus your software has the same patented structure or performs the same steps. If the combination of their hardware and your software does something different than what their hardware and their hardware does, you probably will not be stepping on their patents.

It is possible that the original product comes with a shrink-wrap license or some other restriction you have implicitly agreed to regarding the allowed usage of the product. It is possible that to replace their software you need to violate some DRM system. Otherwise the "intended use" is not relevant.

Regarding the idea that they may be motivated to come after you because you took bread from their mouths; it seems that your thing requires their thing and if you did make and sell 100 of your things you would have bought 100 of their things and they have not been deprived of revenue. That assumes their software and software are not sold independently.

Regarding just doing something for you own use, patent laws do not have a "fair use" provision like copyright laws. Of course no one is going to bother you but someone using, making, etc. it for themselves can still be patent infringement.

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Patents cover specific structures or methods. Regarding patents, the question is whether or not you will use, sell, offer for sale, make, or import something that has the claimed structure or performs the claimed steps. If a patent is specific to the hardware, you are just using off the shelf hardware so a hardware-only patent is not an issue for you. If a patent covers the hardware and software meaning together they have a novel structure of perform novel steps, you might also be ok unless the hardware plus your software has the same patented structure or performs the same steps. If the combination of their hardware and your software does something different than what their hardware and their hardware does, you probably will not be stepping on their patents.

It is possible that the original product comes with a shrink-wrap license or some other restriction you have implicitly agreed to regarding the allowed usage of the product. It is possible that to replace their software you need to violate some DRM system. Otherwise the "intended use" is not relevant.

Regarding the idea that they may be motivated to come after you because you took bread from their mouths; it seems that your thing requires their thing and if you did make and sell 100 of your things you would have bought 100 of their things and they have not been deprived of revenue. That assumes their software and software are not sold independently.

Regarding just doing something for you own use, patent laws do not have a "fair use" provision like copyright laws. Of course no one is going to bother you but using it for yourself can still be patent infringement.