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Alice is assaulted by Bob. Alice reports the assault to the police, including the fact that Bob is the assailant. The police investigate then turn their findings over to the local prosecutor's office. After reviewing the case, the prosecutor's office brings charges and issues an arrest warrant for Bob. The charging documents list Alice as Jane Doe.

At what point(s) in the proceedings can the public get access to the (possibly redacted) records for this case, such as police report(s), witness statements, etc?

If Alice has given interviews to the press (as Jane Doe) about the case, would that change the availability of the records?

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At what point(s) in the proceedings can the public get access to the (possibly redacted) records for this case, such as police report(s), witness statements, etc?

Generally, as filings are made in court, unless a court specifically seals the records. Sometimes law enforcement will release underlying evidence sooner than when it is filed with the court or presented at trial, but this is the exception rather than the rule, and is usually done in the discretion of the law enforcement agency in control of these records. The public rarely has access as a matter of right to the underlying evidence in pending criminal cases until it is filed with the court or presented at trial.

But in a Jane Doe case involving a sexual assault victim, this is not disclosed to the general public and people who attend the trial would be subject to a gag order of some kind, limited to not disclosing the sexual assault victim's identity publicly.

If Alice has given interviews to the press (as Jane Doe) about the case, would that change the availability of the records?

No. Not as a matter of law in most circumstances, although there is a divide between sexual assault victims who can request a Jane Doe filing and all other kinds of criminal cases.

In an ordinary case, a public statement might cause a law enforcement agency which had been holding back information to release it more rapidly, but usually "defensive" publicity of this kind is more likely to follow from public statements made by Bob than from public statements made by Alice.

It isn't clear from the sources available to me, however, how this would play out in a sex offense case where a Jane Doe filing is allowed by California law. A Jane Doe filing and the related protections of the victim's identity are only allowed at the victim's request and a public reveal by Alice of her identity might be interpreted as a revocation of that request that would cause the Jane Doe status of the case to end. But I am not familiar with case law one way or the other on that issue.

The California rules for Jane Doe sex assault victim case privacy dovetail fairly closely with the policies of media outlets, however. Media outlets often have policies (which are not legally binding in and of themselves but in California are sometimes reinforced by state law) about not disclosing sexual assault victim's identities in their reporting unless the victim does so.

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