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Say I live close to a cell phone relay and have measured a radiation level that I deem may be dangerous to me or my children.

Say I build myself a faraday cage/wave screen around my house, potentially resulting in poor nework coverage for my neighbours.

Questions about land property and constructing permits apart, can I be sued for that? By the network operator? by the neighbours?

Note: I live in mainland France

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    It's your house, build it however you like, as long as it conforms to code. Anything exterior to the house can and likely will be the cause of valid complaint, so you'll have to tear it down if someone is unhappy with how it looks, let alone for blocking signal. – Nij Sep 27 '16 at 20:34
  • The law generally does not protect you when you are interfering with others' lives in the process. If you do something that actually interferes with signals in your area in a major way, you might open yourself up to damages lawsuits from the other residents or cell companies for interfering with their customers' business (they're losing money because of your actions). I'm sure their strategy would be to continue suing you until you either comply with their requests or go bankrupt and lose the house so someone else can buy it and subsequently comply with their requests. – animuson Sep 28 '16 at 6:04
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    Note that there is no scientific evidence for cell phone radiation being harmful (see e.g. Do mobile phones have anything to do with brain cancer? on skeptics.SE). So the premise of your question is probably flawed... – sleske Sep 28 '16 at 11:51
  • First you should really read arpansa.gov.au/radiationprotection/basics/ion_nonion.cfm, second, it is clear you don't really understand what a Faraday cage is. A Faraday cage will act no differently than ground in that area, i.e. it won't cause any unusual interference to your neighbors. – Sam Sep 28 '16 at 15:20
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Say I build myself a faraday cage/wave screen around my house, potentially resulting in poor nework coverage for my neighbours.

Questions about land property and constructing permits apart, can I be sued for that? By the network operator? by the neighbours?

In most countries, the use of the radio spectrum is regulated (who may send what on which frequency, at which power, etc.). As part of these regulations it is usually forbidden to interfere with the reception of radio waves.

So if what you do causes your neighbours to have reception problems, then yes, that will most likely be illegal.

In France, the government agency responsible for these problems is ARCEP (Autorité de Régulation des Communications Électroniques et des Postes). If someone notices reception problems, they can complain to ARCEP, as explained for example on the page Le traitement des plaintes en brouillage ("Handling of complaints about jamming").

While you will probably not go to prision for jamming reception, you could have to pay a significant fine. This article on cell phone jamming mentions a penalty of "up to six months in prison or a 30,000 € fine" for "selling or installing" a cell phone jammer. In addition to that, anyone harmed by the reception problems could sue you in civil court and try to collect financial damages (how much that would be will be up to a judge to decide).


That said, note that a faraday cage around your house should not hinder reception outside your house. A faraday cage only influences reception inside the cage, not outside. However, that is off-topic here :-).

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  • +1 I don't know that it's off-topic to mention that a Faraday cage should technically not cause the issues that would make achieving the goal illegal. – Patrick87 Sep 28 '16 at 12:11
  • @Patrick87: Well, the question of whether or not a Faraday cage does what OP believes it does is off-topic here, since it's about physics/engineering. So I chose to mainly answer the legal part of the question (whether interfering with reception is illegal). – sleske Sep 28 '16 at 12:24
  • I would not consider a passing reference to a faraday cage "off topic" but I would hedge it with the warning of "I am not a physicist. Please consult an expert in scientific matters for this topic." – Libra Sep 28 '16 at 14:50
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No, you can't.

First, unless your home is actually on the cell phone tower (i.e. within 300mm of the transmitter) you cannot be exposed to harmful levels of radiation.

Notwithstanding, to be effective the house would need to be entirely enclosed in the cage - I think that a house without windows would not be permissible.

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    So why would it be against the law for him to do this? AFAIK the screen can be rat-wire size, which many people use over windows for security purposes anyhow. – user6726 Sep 28 '16 at 0:46

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