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I read in some IEEE copyright and consent form for a conference the following section:

In connection with the permission granted in Section 1, the author hereby grants IEEE the unlimited, worldwide, irrevocable right to use his/her name, picture, likeness, voice and biographical information as part of the advertisement, distribution and sale of products incorporating the Work or Presentation, and releases IEEE from any claim based on right of privacy or publicity.

Does it mean that some IEEE employee is legally allow to snap a picture of the author anywhere, at any time, and use it in some ad that incorporates the work/presentation (since "incorporate" is very vague from my understanding, I don't see it much as a legal constraint)?


Since conferences tend to abandon their websites quite quickly, here is a copy of the entire IEEE copyright and consent form:

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migrated from academia.stackexchange.com Sep 28 '16 at 12:03

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  • 2
    This might be referring to the picture you use in the biographical part of a IEEE paper. Still, if you have no way to avoid it in way of publishing your work, it's probably not enforceable by them; but, IANAL, and so you need professional legal advice. – Captain Emacs Sep 28 '16 at 0:07
  • The answer to your question is yes, but you seem to have misinterpreted the "incorporating" clause. The advertisement being mentioned is an advertisement for a product that incorporates the work; whether the advertisement itself incorporates the work is not mentioned and probably unimportant. If you're asking whether that paragraph gives them the right to incorporate your work into their advertisement, no, it doesn't, but the first section, in which you assign the copyright to IEEE, does. – phoog Sep 28 '16 at 14:20

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