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Can a private entity in the states of Massachusetts, California, or New York refuse a payment made with coins (e.g., on the ground that they only accept a maximum of X coins)?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_tender#United_States says:

There is, however, no federal statute that a private business, a person, or an organization must accept currency or coins as for payment for goods and/or services. Private businesses are free to develop their own policies on whether or not to accept cash unless there is a State law which says otherwise. For example, a bus line may prohibit payment of fares in cents or dollar bills. In addition, movie theaters, convenience stores and gas stations may refuse to accept large denomination currency (usually notes above $20) as a matter of policy.

I wonder whether the states of Massachusetts, California, or New York have such laws.

marked as duplicate by user6726, feetwet Oct 21 '16 at 22:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • @Nij The other question fails to mention the states. – Franck Dernoncourt Oct 21 '16 at 4:27
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    Most likely they can just refuse to do business with you for any reason that isn't illegal discrimination. Discriminating against someone who wants to pay with 2,000 cent coins is perfectly legal. – gnasher729 Oct 21 '16 at 8:12
  • @gnasher729 That's illegal in my home country (France) so I'm being cautious :-) – Franck Dernoncourt Oct 21 '16 at 13:35
  • What reason do you have to believe that any state has special laws for a federal matter like legal tender for commerce using federal currency? – feetwet Oct 21 '16 at 22:29
  • @feetwet the quote from the Wikipedia article "Private businesses are free to develop their own policies on whether or not to accept cash unless there is a State law which says otherwise." – Franck Dernoncourt Oct 21 '16 at 22:33