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Independent.co.uk:

Indeed, they risk falling foul of the government’s definition of extremism, which covers not only committed jihadis, but also anyone who vocally or actively opposes “fundamental British values”.

Is there a risk of getting flagged as an extremist if someone opposes “fundamental British values” in Britain?

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  • Some groups (e.g. Quakers, Mennonites) do actively oppose the fundamental British value of being willing to fight for one's country, and they are extremist pacifists. Will they all be treated as dangerous criminals too? Apr 17 at 12:51
  • This might be better over on Politics, as it's not really about the law. Apr 17 at 13:51
  • Is "fundamental British values" defined anywhere? @PaulJohnson certainly this question could be made more specifically about law. If the asker's intention was to focus on legal aspects, it would be better to edit the question than to migrate it. Also the question is over three years old.
    – phoog
    Apr 17 at 14:39
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As of August 2016 (and I can't find any hint that the situation has changed), there is no legislation that defines "extremism".

http://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-security-extremism-idUKKCN10S0ZV

However, there is still no sign of the legislation, with the Home Office (interior ministry) saying it would come in "due course". One main obstacle is who decides who or what is extremist.

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  • The question wasn't about the law.
    – ruffle
    Apr 17 at 11:11
  • @ruffle this whole site is about law.
    – phoog
    Apr 17 at 14:39
  • You'd better delete the question then.
    – ruffle
    Apr 18 at 17:44
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Ask the British "Home Office" (interior ministry), who publish an email address for public enquiries. The Independent newspaper refers to a government definition of "extremism", which the Home Office will be able to tell you where to find if you cannot find it. There is not much point in the government's referring to "fundamental British values" if they don't define the term. My guess is that they do define it somewhere.

"Extremism" can sometimes be a silly term, insofar as one can ask "extreme what, exactly?", and one can suppose that whatever the "what" might be, it may well be considered acceptable by the opponents of the said "extremism" if it manifests in a "moderate" form.

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