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I have been involved, pro se, in a special education impartial hearing on behalf of my son. I would like to publish some parts of the hearing documents in articles on the web and in a book. Is that allowed? Here is a list of all the documents I might like to draw upon (I would redact identifying features and use pseudonyms for names):

  • My exhibits, which include my son's educational records, email correspondence with the district, and my hearing request letter

  • The hearing transcript (I contacted the transcription service to see if they mind; the manager is out this week but they will get back to me when she is back)

  • My closing argument

  • The district's closing argument

  • The hearing officer's decision (which will be posted on the state education department's website in a few months, with our names redacted, but with the name of the hearing officer not redacted)

  • My petition of appeal to the state review office, with memorandum of law and the entire email correspondence the district lawyer and I had with the hearing officer as an additional exhibit (note, the district lawyer and I were required to cc each other on all of that correspondence)

  • The district's Answer to the state review office, with a memorandum of law

  • My Reply to the Answer

  • The review officer's decision, which will eventually be posted on the state education department's website

I plan to use pseudonyms for my son and me and the rest of our family.

I noticed that some hearing officer decisions and some review office decisions include last names of district witnesses. I think that ethically I should omit them, even if the state doesn't redact them.

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Many states prohibit revealing the identity of a minor in a proceeding, and you indicate that you would also do so. Otherwise, they are public records and there is generally no prohibition on disclosing them.

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  • "Would also do so"? I don't understand. Are you saying I would also reveal his identity? Are you saying I would also protect his identity? // Thank you very much for the information about the documents being public records. – aparente001 Jan 20 '17 at 5:08
  • I'm saying you would also redact his identity. – ohwilleke Jan 20 '17 at 6:16

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