1

I am applying for a Texas state ID card at the DMV. I need a "U.S. Certificate of Citizenship or Certificate of Naturalization (N-560, N-561, N-645, N-550, N-55G, N-570 or N-578)" or one of the other documents on a list that I don't think I'll bother showing, and I was wondering if my birth certificate counted as this type of document. My birth certificate was issued from a county in the state of California.

3
  • 2
    Your birth certificate issued from where? – user702 Mar 3 '17 at 22:57
  • Edited, birth certificate issued from a county in california, don't want to be more specific than that. – Aaron Franke Mar 3 '17 at 23:17
  • 1
    Should be enough. Some people have hospital only certificates, for instance, which are generally not acceptable. – user702 Mar 3 '17 at 23:31
3

From the Texas Department of Public Safety brochure listing the types of documents that indicate how to demonstrate "Proof of US Citizenship or Lawful Presence:"

Birth certificate or birth record issued by the appropriate State Bureau of Vital Statistics or equivalent agency from a US state or local government, a US territory, or the District of Columbia

A birth certificate issued by a county in the State of California would qualify. Note that most government agencies require a certified copy of the birth certificate be used. A certified copy will generally have an endorsement via a stamp indicating that it is a certified copy and, for California, would be available from the county vital records department.

A "U.S. Certificate of Citizenship" is for U.S. citizens born abroad. A "Certificate of Naturalization" is for people who became citizens through the naturalization process. Neither of these documents would apply to someone who was born in the United States.

1
  • 2
    "A "U.S. Certificate of Citizenship" is for U.S. citizens born abroad." Naturalized US citizens are also US citizens who were born abroad. I think you mean people born abroad who were US citizens at birth. But Certificates of Citizenship are also for people who were not US citizens at birth, who were naturalized as minors, either automatically as a permanent resident child of a citizen, or through an expedited naturalization process for children of citizens residing abroad. – user102008 Mar 4 '17 at 1:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.