0

There is a certificate in the Russian bureaucratic system that is literally called:

Certificate that a person is currently living with a dead man

The reason for that is that a dead man is still registered in that place (referring to Russian resident registration). So it really looks like a dead man is living with those who are alive "according to documents".

Is there any analogue in US? Or is the bureaucratic system built so that you do not need to certify you are living with the dead?

  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about a bureaucratic process, not the law itself. – Nij Jul 4 '17 at 19:53
  • 1
    @Nij , burocratic process is defined and ruled by law. E.g. according to the law of Russian Federation I have to have resident registration – Ivan Gerasimenko Jul 5 '17 at 6:54
3

I have never heard of anything like this.

I guess when you say "registered in that place" you are referring to Russian resident registration. The US doesn't have such a system, so this sort of certificate wouldn't even make sense.

|improve this answer|||||
  • You are right, "Resident Registration". So burocratic system does not need to know where you could be found in case e.g. debt collection (taxes), conscription? Sounds strange. How could be "Resident Registration" ommited in these cases? – Ivan Gerasimenko Jul 4 '17 at 14:49
  • 1
    Just a different system. The state and federal governments know most people's addresses from things like drivers licenses, voter registration, and tax filing, but there isn't a single master registry. Conscription ("selective service") is a separate registry also, which is only applicable to males age 18 to 25. One doesn't generally have to "unregister" from any of these things if you move or die, though there is a requirement to report deaths, so the state can correlate these databases if it wants to. – Nate Eldredge Jul 4 '17 at 14:55

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.