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If the President were to show up at my home and demand entry for some reason (unlikely as that would be), do I have the right to refuse?

I am aware that it would be a felony to make direct threats against the President's person, but this seems to be a grey area. For instance, if they tried to force my door open, and I resisted from the other side. Again, a fantasy world but nonetheless I ask. It's still my home, and there's a trespassing intruder, but then again the President has all sorts of rights and privileges denied everyone else.

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    "The poorest man may in his cottage bid defiance to all the forces of the Crown. It may be frail — its roof may shake — the wind may blow through it — the storm may enter — the rain may enter — but the King of England cannot enter — all his force dares not cross the threshold of the ruined tenement! " (Wm Pitt, 1763) (not wishing to cast aspersions on the state of your house). I doubt whether the President has more rights than the King. – Tim Lymington Sep 1 '17 at 21:27
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Yes.

You can deny the President entry to your home unless the President has something that constitutes an exception to that right such as a search warrant. The President does not have any special right to trespass on private property.

You need not threaten the President to do so. You would simply say "no, I am not granting you permission to enter. Please do not come in.", politely and in a calm voice.

If you were ignored, and the President entered without your consent, your best course of action would be to sue after the fact, rather than resorting to violence, even if other options might be legally available to you.

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