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What liability do I have if I make an opensource piece of malware (registered under MIT), and then someone takes it and uses it to infect hundreds of computers? Could I be taken to court for that? Or are they purely accountable?

If I could be held accountable for that, is there a license which would prevent this?

The duplicate is incorrect, as that is about paid program (I believe) rather than an open source program anyone can use. It's not like I'm writing the malware and giving it to people to use, I'm releasing the source for people to take a look and see how it works.

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  • Search the site before you post; there are multiple answers for variants on your question. Feb 12 '18 at 18:45
  • I don't see any reason to think that the open-source status makes any difference. Feb 13 '18 at 3:56
  • Not like you are writing it for people to use is a fine line I doubt would hold up in a court of law.
    – paparazzo
    Feb 13 '18 at 14:39
  • "It's not like I'm writing the malware and giving it to people to use, I'm releasing the source..." - By releasing the source, you are also giving it to be people to use.
    – Brandin
    Feb 14 '18 at 9:48
  • "Malware" is not clear. For example, you could write a program that formats hard disks (erasing their data), and a user could use that to format someone else's hard disks (i.e. destroy a user's data without authorization). This is certainly not your fault. On the other hand, suppose you write a game that contains a secret program which runs in the background, copying itself to other computers on the network without authorization or action by the user. You are likely breaking laws in this case, even if the secret program does not actually do anything "malicious."
    – Brandin
    Feb 14 '18 at 9:53