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In the United States could I sue the Federal government because I don't agree with my money being used to kill people in wars? Is there any legal precedent? Are there any active movements to try to get people to do this, or to join some kind of class action lawsuit?

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    You can object as much as you want but you still have to pay the taxes. – JAB Feb 14 '18 at 19:18
  • Voting to close as duplicate and, although this option isn't available when voting to close, due to foolishness – A.fm. Feb 14 '18 at 19:22
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    @JAB if you can do the time, you can do the crime. So you can object and not pay the taxes, but you can expect to be punished for it. – phoog Feb 14 '18 at 20:18
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    @user6726 And even then the US is pretty strict about taxes when you renounce citizenship. – JAB Feb 14 '18 at 20:19
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    @user6726 it's theoretically possible to leave the country without becoming subject to another regime's income tax laws, but the quality of life may leave something to be desired. – phoog Feb 14 '18 at 20:20
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You can't sue the federal government. (Unless you have been injured by a government agency; then you may be able to sue under the The Federal Tort Claims Act | Nolo.com.) Anti-tax lawsuits simply don't get anywhere in the federal legal system, because you can't show injury and taxes are indeed legal; and as a result, no class action lawsuits. Try https://www.google.com/search?q=do+I+legally+have+to+pay+taxes

But read Conscientious objection to military taxation - Wikipedia and also IRS - Application of Section 6702 Penalty to Taxpayer Who Files a Return with War Complaint for some background of anti-war-tax movements and the legal justifications they attempt to show are valid.

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You cannot object morally to federal income taxation in the United States, although you can reduce your taxes on that income by making charitable deductions or by declining to earn income.

Certain clergy from faiths that have a moral objection to Social Security can be exempt from FICA taxation by statute rather than by any constitutional right to do so, but they give up any benefits from FICA funded programs by doing so.

In the United States could I sue the Federal government because I don't agree with my money being used to kill people in wars?

No.

Is there any legal precedent?

Yes. There are many legal precedents declining to allow this to be done

Are there any active movements to try to get people to do this,

Yes. They are crushed mercilessly by federal tax officials and prosecutors. Serious tax penalties, property seizures, criminal convictions and prison terms routinely follow in all cases of people who attempt to do this in practice.

or to join some kind of class action lawsuit?

Someone could attempt to bring a class action lawsuit. It would in all likelihood be dismissed before a judge certified the class as a frivolous lawsuit and would probably result in court issued sanctions against the persons bringing the lawsuit and their counsel. It would fail both on the merits and for lack of standing to sue in all likelihood.

  • It would be dismissed, for various reasons, but not for lack of standing. If you pay taxes you have standing. – D M Feb 14 '18 at 21:19
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    @DM, you don't have standing simply because you pay taxes. – A.fm. Feb 14 '18 at 22:39
  • @DM A.fm. is right. Generally speaking you don't suffer a legally cognizable injury for standing purposes because of the manner in which the revenues collected via your taxes are spent, even if some or all of that spending is contrary to your strongly held religious or ethical principles. Taxpayers only have standing in their capacity as taxpayers when their individual tax bill is miscalculated pursuant to the Internal Revenue Code or collected when tax law says that it isn't owed. (There is also generally no "citizen" or "voter" standing related to how money paid in taxes is spent.) – ohwilleke Feb 14 '18 at 23:45

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