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My LLC is developing a new line of products and we're looking at getting trademarks. We have a brand name, and the product name is distinctive when used with the brand name, but it's a pretty generic word. Would it be smarter to trademark the brand name and try to trademark the product name, or to trademark the entire thing together? We do plan to add other similar products under the brand name, and our company name is different than the brand name.

For example, if my company is Bob'sProducts, and we have a new line of products coming out called SqueakyClean, and the first product is going to be called the SqueakyClean SuperScrubber, and down the road we're going to launch the SqueakyClean ScrubbySponge, would we want to trademark SqueakyClean, SuperScrubber and ScrubbySponge separately, or trademark SqueakyClean SuperScrubber as one term, and then trademark SqueakyClean ScrubbySponge at a later date?

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"down the road" is not currently in the stream of commerce.

trademark SqueakyClean SuperScrubber as one term, and then trademark SqueakyClean ScrubbySponge at a later date

is a practical approach. That is, trademark the name of the product that has been launched, as the mark appears on the product or packaging.

  • That's what we plan to do, but should we also trademark SqueakyClean in this hypothetical case? – CMB Aug 6 '18 at 0:41
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    @CMB Does "SqueakyClean" appear on the product or packaging as a standalone term? – guest271314 Aug 6 '18 at 0:41
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    It will probably appear on its own in some places. – CMB Aug 6 '18 at 0:43
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    Then yes, trademarking the term "SqueakyClean" within the sector of the industry the product is classified within would also be prudent. – guest271314 Aug 6 '18 at 0:45
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    How would we do that? Is that something that needs addressed in the trademark process, or just in the advertising? – CMB Aug 6 '18 at 0:48

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