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My boyfriend thought he was co-signing for his sons car. Turns at they made him the primary loan holder but did not put him on the title.Does a car dealership have a legal obligation to put the primary loan holder on the title in Ohio?

  • "My boyfriend thought he was co-signing for his sons car. Turns at they made him the primary loan holder but did not put him on the title." What is confusing or problematic about this? What you describe happening is exactly what "co-signing" means. – ohwilleke Sep 4 '18 at 23:02
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No. People buy cars for other people all the time. The dealership has no obligation to figure out why your boyfriend was willing to accept a loan obligation for a car he did not own.

That said, this situation sounds about as shady as it can be. If your boyfriend entered into a different relationship with the bank than he intended to, something went badly wrong.

  • I don't think it sounds shady at all. "Co-signing" does not mean "co-owning" and if the boyfriend thought so, he was stupid, not deceived. People co-sign loans for their children all the time. – ohwilleke Sep 4 '18 at 23:08
  • I agree that the boyfriend cosigning a loan for his kid is not shady. It is shady that he understood he was doing one thing but in fact was doing another. It indicates he did not have a good understanding of what he was signing, either because he did not read it, or because he did not understand what he read. Either of those deserves imvestigation. – Matt Sep 6 '18 at 0:26
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Disclaimer: The basis of this answer is contract law. I am not knowledgeable of Ohio legislation, but I doubt any applicable Ohio statutes significantly depart from contract law in this regard.

Does a car dealership have a legal obligation to put the primary loan holder on the title in Ohio?

Not necessarily. Before an injunction for specific performance can be entered (such as putting the loan primary holder on the title), it would have to be proved that the dealership violates/violated the covenant of good faith and fair dealing.

For instance, the dealership unreasonable refusal to make the pertinent corrections despite the mistake being its fault, that might be evidence that the dealership is violating the aforementioned covenant.

  • The dealership didn't do anything wrong. If he agreed to "co-sign" that means he agreed to be a primary loan obligor on the car without being put on title. That is what "co-signing" a loan means. – ohwilleke Sep 4 '18 at 23:10

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