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I work from home for a virtual call center. I provide my own equipment but am required to use their software to connect to them, which often has problems. When these arise, and they cannot be resolved within 30 minutes by their software vendor, I am required to clock out.

This happened to me 3 hours ago, and I am now in legal limbo. The software vendor told me to await a return call, not as yet received. I'm essentially on call now, or am I? I won't be paid for this time, so how long must I wait before I can no longer be expected to clock back in today?

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    "The software vendor told me to await a return call, not as yet received. I'm essentially on call now, or am I?" Did you ask your employer that question? – Greendrake Oct 5 '18 at 23:02
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    Yes of course I did, which is why I said the time spent waiting would be unpaid. It says this in the employee handbook. But is that legal? I should add that employees are required to furnish their own computer equipment in order to be allowed to work from home, but are not independent contractors. – JPMaverick Oct 12 '18 at 9:23
  • The handbook would be a part of the terms you have agreed with. Therefore it'll be perfectly legal unless some local employment law makes it unenforceable. And you haven't specified where you are. – Greendrake Oct 12 '18 at 21:44
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As an employee you are required to follow the “lawful and reasonable” instructions of your employer. Asking you to wait is lawful. Asking you to wait indefinitely is not reasonable. How long a period must be before it becomes unreasonable depends on the circumstances.

  • Of course when you are following the instructions of your employer, you should be paid for it. – gnasher729 Nov 18 '18 at 22:13

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