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I rented a flat in London and it has two storage cupboards in the hallway. But those cupboards are occupied by landlord's stuff so I am unable to use those spaces that I am paying for. It has been three months since we moved in and I have constantly been asking the agency to ask the landlord to remove the stuff. My argument is that if the landlord is renting out his place, he can not continue using the storage space to keep his personal stuff.

But the agency says that the landlord is refusing to remove it. The landlord is saying that the house was furnished and that means his personal items that he is keeping in our storage space is part of it. I find that argument utterly stupid and have never heard furnished apartments to mean this.

Since the agency and the landlord refuse to help us, what are my options?

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    Did you ask about that stuff when viewing the flat / before signing the tenancy? If not, that stuff is yours to use/move around like the furniture. – Greendrake Oct 18 '18 at 22:09
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    Does the tenancy agreement mention these cupboards at all, even indirectly? – Steve Melnikoff Oct 19 '18 at 9:03
  • If the landlord is claiming the items are furnishings, do you have access to use them for intended or reasonable purposes (like you would a bed or sofa)? – ItWasLikeThatWhenIGotHere Oct 19 '18 at 9:48
  • @Greendrake - Oops. Should have read your second sentence more carefully - I've pretty much duplicated it. I think what's most likely is that the landlord is misusing the interpretation of "furnishings", but if he isn't that would be a reasonable inference (and if that's not the intended implication, he doesn't get to call them furnishings...) – ItWasLikeThatWhenIGotHere Oct 19 '18 at 10:00
  • @Greendrake When we viewed the apartment, it was still occupied by the previous tenants. We just assumed the stuff belonged to the previous tenants and they would move out with it. – user74207 Oct 19 '18 at 15:47
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Write to the landlord giving them a reasonable period to remove it - say a month, after which you will dispose of it and see what happens.

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    Sounds like a bad advice. The stuff could include say an original Ming vase which the tenant is allowed to use like the bed and chairs. Disposing it would make the tenant liable for several million dollars in damages. – Greendrake Oct 19 '18 at 7:28

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