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does law defines any limitation that tells how much can a hacker use his knowledge in different way? Any boundary that tells about hacker and cracker.

closed as off-topic by BlueDogRanch, Nij, Dale M, Ron Beyer, MSalters Dec 2 '18 at 0:48

  • This question does not appear to be about law, within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's not about the law and belongs on english.stackexchange.com – BlueDogRanch Dec 1 '18 at 16:21
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    Hacker can refer to "white hat" hackers or "black hat" hackers, with the latter being the "bad" guys. Hacking is typically infiltrating a network for various reasons, while "cracking" is to remove license restrictions on particular software. I hope this is moved to English.SE or Information Security.SE as it would be much more appropriate there. – Ron Beyer Dec 1 '18 at 22:46
  • @RonBeyer Good points, although technically speaking "hacking" may also involve removal of restrictions (doing some "hack" in the code) and "cracking" typically also involves brute-forcing of credentials to infiltrate a network. In other words, network vs. license restrictions does not delimit the distinction between these two terms. It rather boils down to the motive for messing up with the system (irrespective of it being a network or an executable). – Iñaki Viggers Dec 1 '18 at 23:15
  • Adnan: I see you edited the question, but it is still off-topic as "too broad." To get an idea of why, look at all of the questions tagged hacking. – feetwet Dec 2 '18 at 15:48
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Difference between hacker and cracker. according to my teacher Hacker is a good person and Cracker is a bad person? can anyone explain?

I agree this is not a question about law. Anyway ...

Cracker connotes a purpose of inflicting harm by taking advantage of system vulnerabilities that the person detected. A hacker also searches for vulnerabilities in a system, but the difference is that he would report them to the systems owner/programmer, or maybe even help with the solution.

I think the difference of meanings has not been formalized, though, which is why both terms often are used interchangeably.

  • @AdnanButt You're very welcome. – Iñaki Viggers Dec 1 '18 at 16:43
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    You agree it's off-topic and answer anyway? This contributes to more people asking off-topic questions, knowing that they'll get an answer anyway, and lowers quality. – Nij Dec 1 '18 at 19:19
  • @Nij Relax. When the post gets moved to another SE site, it will go with answer and all. No big deal. – Iñaki Viggers Dec 1 '18 at 22:29
  • @Nij i got my answer . it is my mistake to ask this question on wrong site. I'll delete this question. – David sirmon Dec 2 '18 at 6:23
  • @Nij I have edited my question to relation of Law . i also have this question on my mind . please check and guide me with your answer . – David sirmon Dec 2 '18 at 6:27

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