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I am currently renting a property and I lost my job. I am in a two year contract to let the property, of which I have over 18 months left.

I am living in the UK.

The landlord did not ask for a guarantor.

I am currently living off my savings which are getting demolished. I am moving out of the property to go home to save money (food, gas, electric , etc.). When the time comes to when I run out of money what are my options?

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    You should talk to the Citizens Advice Bureau. Then talk to the landlord about your situation. Don't let on how much savings you have. What are the early-termination rules in your lease? Try to get out early before your savings are exhausted. – Paul Johnson Jan 9 at 14:24
  • There are no break clauses in the contract. Is it in the landlords interest to take me to court over such things? – ZingyMcGhee Jan 9 at 15:06
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    It's in the landlord's interest to get money. Taking you to court would cost money, and there'd be no guarantee you'd be able to pay any damages. Both of you would be better off with a negotiated agreement. – David Thornley Jan 9 at 19:06
  • Would you happen to know if I would have to pay council tax on the property since I am not living there? – ZingyMcGhee Jan 11 at 13:39
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If you break the contract then you are required to pay damages to put the landlord in the same financial position as if you had not breached the contract.

Typically, this would mean that you owe rent for any period the property was not rented by someone else, the difference between the rent a new tenant pays and your rent if the new rent is lower and the landlord's costs in finding a new tenant, usually advertising costs, legal costs and agents fees and commissions.

Ideally, you would work with your landlord before you are in breach to minimize these costs or negotiate a amount to pay to allow you to end the contract without breaking it.

If you are unable to pay what you owe when it is due then you are insolvent and need to look at your options.

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