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I am planning to sue a cellular company for charging me (for two phone numbers) for 10 years after a cutoff request. I contacted the company, and they admitted to wrongly charging me but only for one number and offered me a reimbursement - which's about 1/3 of the whole charged amount. Now I want to know how to make the legal argument that the sole fact of admitting to wrongly charging me for one number increases the likeability that the company did the same thing with the second number. * I am filing a small claims lawsuit.

Thanks, and if you need more clarifications about the issue please let me know.

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Now I want to know how to make the legal argument that the sole fact of admitting to wrongly charging me for one number increases the likeability that the company did the same thing with the second number.

There isn’t one. You need to prove each allegation on its own merits. Admission of liability for one wrong does not amount to admission for all wrongs alleged. Nor does it allow the inference to be drawn of general dishonesty.

  • Or doesn't it at least bring into questioning the credibility of the company? Also, given the fact that I managed both numbers, and I would have not cut off one of them - and subscribe to another carrier - without doing so with the other. – elias-98 Feb 17 at 23:28
  • @elias-98 No, it doesn't work that way. The fact that I admit to one offence/mistake/wrong has nothing to do with if I committed another. – Dale M Feb 17 at 23:35
  • @elias-98 - Not sure why you think it would - they admitted to their mistake and rectified it, why would that imply poor credibility? – colmde Feb 18 at 8:49
  • There might be a link, but it doesn't appear in the question. An example could be that the two numbers are billed as one product. As the claimant, you have the burden to show the association. – MSalters Feb 18 at 10:56
  • @MSalters both numbers were included in the same bill. Is that a possible link? – elias-98 Feb 18 at 12:05

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