2

This is embarrassing and I realize I should have done things differently. I live in a shared home and pay rent to the lease holder. He doesn't want me to live here anymore and has given me a few days to move out. Between work and finding a new place, this is not enough time. He said if I sign additional terms and pay more money I can stay one more month. He said if I don't give him a key to my room he will kick me out immediately.

I have an agreement by email for the cost of rent and damage deposit etc. however it says nothing about ending the arrangement.

What rights do I have? I know if I did have a RTB tenancy agreement the landlord would have to go to court and hire a bailiff to kick someone out. What's the minimum amount of notice to vacate, I can't believe it's just one day? I'm afraid the lease holder, who lives in the same house as me, will

  1. change the locks while I'm out
  2. remove my belongings and put them outside
  3. remove my belongings and keep them for himself
  4. try to physically remove me from the house

If any of these happen should I call the police just to make a report? Should I tell the leaseholder it's illegal to kick me out without notice?

2

"an agreement by email for the cost of rent and damage deposit etc." may well constitute a lease. If it doesn't specify a term or ending method, it is probably a month to month lease. If nothing is specified about notice to leave, you probably should gt 30 days notice.

The law in BC is the Residential Tenancy Act. However, many localities have laws that modify or supplement the provincial law.

You probably need legal assitance beyond the scope of this forum. a Tenant Resource Advisory Center (Trac) might be able to help. Their web sitre also provides links to various other resources, including legal referrals. The Tennant Survival Guide offers pointers to legal aid. This site offers additional resources. So does the BC Law institute

Note, even if you have certain legal rights in theory, the person from whom you are renting may not respect these. Consult legal or community sources to determine your best approach.

This question is really beyond the scope of this forum.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.