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[Source:] The landlord argued that the tenant must pay the administration costs based on the covenant[,] given by the tenant in the lease which read as follows:

“To pay all expenses (including Landlord’s solicitors’ costs and surveyors fees)
incurred by the Landlord [,and] incidental to the preparation and service of notice under Section 146 of the Law of Property Act 1925
notwithstanding that forfeiture is avoided otherwise than by relief granted by the court.”

What does the bolded mean? I wish to understand it in terms of the bolded sentence as written; so please don't just paraphrase it. For example, I'm confused by the combined use of notwithstanding (preposition), otherwise (adverb), and than (conjunction).

Footnote: The quote concerns UK law, but similar diction is found in other juridsdictions.

  • Any particular reason for the word "parse"? – HDE 226868 Jun 4 '15 at 23:34
  • How do we explain what it means without rephrasing it? It means tenant pay all expenses even if the court is not used to avoid forfeiture. – jqning Jun 5 '15 at 0:29
  • @HDE226868 Sorry for any confusion; I use it because I want to understand each word in the sentence; I seek NOT just a paraphrase. Does this help? Or is the word (used at Eng Lang Learners) too esoteric? – Greek - Area 51 Proposal Jun 5 '15 at 1:31
  • @LawArea51Proposal-Commit It helps, thanks. – HDE 226868 Jun 5 '15 at 1:33
  • @HDE226868 YW. Please advise on my diction if poor. – Greek - Area 51 Proposal Jun 5 '15 at 2:52
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One possible reading of this clause is:

The tenant is required to pay for the preparation of a forfeiture notice, even if ("notwithstanding that") the forfeiture doesn't actually happen ("forfeiture is avoided")--but the tenant doesn't have to pay for the notice if the forfeiture doesn't happen for the following reason ("avoided otherwise than by"): because the court said so ("by relief granted by the court").

In other words: if the Court says the forfeiture notice is bogus, the tenant doesn't have to pay for it. Otherwise, he or she does.

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