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The protective covenants and restrictions section on the deed of a house has a clause stating:

No trailer, basement, garage, barn, or other outbuildings erected on this property shall at any time be used as a residence temporarily or permanently, nor shall any residence of a temporary character be permitted.

What exactly is "residence of a temporary character" in this context? Does this clause restrict the owner of the house from making it a rental property or an AirBNB home?

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There isn't enough information to give a reliable answer in the abstract. It is a hard concept for lots of people to understand, but words don't have the same meaning in every context. Law is not physics or chemistry. Words that mean one thing in a particular instrument or statute could mean another thing somewhere else, even if exactly the same words are used. More context would be helpful in determining a meaning.

It could be a reference to a type of use, like AirBnB or other short term rentals (e.g. use as a hotel or hostel).

It could also be a reference to a type of building that is not permanent such as tents, RVs, or other non-permanent structures intended for residential occupancy.

Usually, a look at what the adjacent and framing language of the covenants say would clarify the intent as would some sense of the kind of structures built or intended to be built in the vicinity.

It also isn't clear from context if the emphasis is on "residential" (e.g. in a property with a storage facility included), or on "temporary" (e.g. in a posh suburb).

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    Thank you @ohwilleke. To answer your questions, it is a residential property. The entire paragraph states: "No trailer, basement, garage, barn, or other outbuildings erected on this property shall at any time be used as a residence temporarily or permanently, nor shall any residence of a temporary character be permitted." Does that provide enough context to my original question? – Jim Jul 2 at 16:00
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    I’d interpret that as “this section of the deed doesn’t disallow renting out your permanent home, but it disallows someone living in a trailer, in your garden shed, in your basement etc. Whether it’s free or for payment.” – gnasher729 Jul 3 at 10:28
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    @gnasher729 I'd agree that your interpretation seems most plausible. – ohwilleke Jul 3 at 12:35
  • Thank you for chiming in and sharing your interpretation. This is very helpful! – Jim Jul 5 at 22:46

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