4

I want a contract written that stipulates that one party agrees to provide a service, and the other party agrees to pay for said service.

What kind of lawyer should I seek to help me with this? Most lawyers seem to specialize in a certain field. Is there a specific field that deals with this?

  • 1
    The nature of the service will likely determine this. For instance if the service is employment, you'd want an employment lawyer. If the service is a corporate transaction, you'd want a transactional or corporate attorney, etc. – Pat W. Oct 6 '15 at 13:20
  • 1
    In some cases, it might be reasonable and natural to write your own contract. Check your local laws, but in many places it's perfectly legal to write contracts to which you will be a party. Of course, that doesn't help if you feel you need assistance in writing this particular contract, but I wanted to point this out in case you thought you had to have a lawyer do it for you. – Patrick87 Oct 6 '15 at 14:13
  • @Patrick87 Overwhelmingly we write our own contracts; imagine having to hire a lawyer every time you wanted to buy groceries. – Dale M Oct 6 '15 at 19:35
1

The general term for such counsel would be "business lawyers". Writing contracts is one of their many duties and where they recognize the hazards and potential vagaries at the periphery of their expertise, they may opt to join a better-qualified co-counsel to assist.

For instance, contracts for hiring free-lance writers or photographers may involve complicated legal analysis of copyright ownership, better addressed by seasoned intellectual property counsel.

Even as a former corporate attorney, I would likely retain personal counsel to at least review, if not draft, any important contract involving myself. That way, were anything to "go wrong" in the execution, there would (in theory) be another attorney responsible for it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.