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Where are U-turns legal in Wisconsin, and specifically Milwaukee? At intersections? In roads? Across interstate medians?

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    As a general rule in American Law, if the law does not say it is illegal, it is legal. My experience is that most states will have signs if any road action is not permitted at a certain point (NYC being a big exception, where a right on red is not permitted unless a sign says it is. Everywhere else this condition is reversed).
    – hszmv
    Aug 1 '19 at 17:41
  • I have recollections of Indiana having no-U-turn laws when I went through Drivers' Ed. Aug 1 '19 at 17:42
  • Hence why I said usually the signs will still show permitted turns. It's not always the case. U-Turns on limited access highways (including Interstates) are normally only permitted for emergency vehicles (police, fire, EMS) and are great spots to set up radar traps so there's going to be high chance of cop. However, in the event that a whole direction of traffic is blocked, it's generally okay for the general public to use the connection to get out of congestion. Having done it once, its still nerve racking as it requires a left into the fast lane.
    – hszmv
    Aug 1 '19 at 17:55
  • @hszmv Yeah -- I wonder how many exceptions like the NYC you mention there are! Aug 1 '19 at 18:17
  • @hszmv By the way, it's fun to meet a user who isn't deeply involved on the "main site." Gives me hope that SE will continue to grow in this way. Aug 1 '19 at 18:19
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U-Turns are legal in Wisconsin except in certain situations where they are restricted:

346.33  U-turns. (1)  The operator of a vehicle may not make a U-turn upon a highway at any of the following places:

346.33(1)(a)(a) At any intersection at which traffic is being controlled by a traffic officer unless instructed by the officer to make a U-turn.

(b) In mid-block on any street in a business district, except where the highway is a divided highway and where the U-turn is made at an opening or crossover established by the authority in charge of the maintenance of the highway.

(c) In mid-block on any through highway in a residence district, except where the highway is a divided highway and where the U-turn is made at an opening or crossover established by the authority in charge of the maintenance of the highway.

(d) At any place where signs prohibiting a U-turn have been erected by the authority in charge of the maintenance of the highway.

(e) Upon a curve or upon the approach to or near the crest of a grade on any undivided highway where the vehicle cannot be seen by the driver of any other vehicle within 500 feet approaching from any direction.

(f) At any place where a U-turn cannot be made safely or without interfering with other traffic.

(1m) The operator of a vehicle shall exercise due care when making a U-turn upon a highway and shall only make a U-turn when the movement can be made safely and without interfering with other traffic.

(2) The operator of a vehicle may not back the vehicle at an intersection controlled by an official traffic control device for the purpose of making a U-turn.

(3) In this section, “mid-block" means any part of a street or highway other than an intersection.

As an aside, U-turns are also legal in Indiana, but are similarly restricted.

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    (f) At any place where a U-turn cannot be made safely or without interfering with other traffic. - That would be the most important rule from a driver's point of view.
    – gnasher729
    Jul 15 '21 at 6:11
  • @gnasher729 Yes, that's the main thing. But I've made U-turns of type (a) in the past and I can see it being prudent to avoid them even if you are willing to wait for traffic to clear. Jul 16 '21 at 15:48

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