1

Background:

In April 2018, I was hired by a company A that outsources services. When I was hired, I signed two promissory notes for $25,000(local currency) for the concept of value of training for my next job. These two promissory notes where supposed to expire or be invalid in these cases:

  • after being employed over a year
  • there were another reason for it to be cancelled but I don't remember them

The client that wanted to hire the services from company A cancelled the project after a month of being hired. They tried to assign me to another place elsewhere but no other client was in need for my services. So I was told by HR that they won't be renovating my temporal contract and that my promissory notes were being annulled for this cause.

Today I received a visit from their lawyer about these promissory notes. He says I need to pay to them and I'm being sued.

What I can do about it? How I can protect myself?

Additional Notes

  • I still know the name of the person that handled my dismissal. He issued/signed a few papers about my exit from the company. Not sure if he still works there. Should I contact him? or it could make it worse? I need to clarify this situation as soon as possible.
  • 5
    Talk to a lawyer. Google for free/low cost legal help in your area. – BlueDogRanch Aug 3 at 22:29
0

What I can do about it? How I can protect myself?

Your description is too vague. It lacks essential information that would allow us identify each party's legal merits. There is no information to barely conjecture whether

  • you are being scammed by company A (which seemingly is just another intermediary in the labor market);
  • company A is misinterpreting or ignoring contract law; or
  • you shot yourself in the foot by signing the promissory notes.

Knowing the terms and context of your contract is crucial, whence there being "another reason for it to be cancelled but I don't remember them" could be --unbeknownst to you-- the key to assessing your situation.

Also, the form and terms of HR's notice of annulment of the promissory notes could also be tantamount to company A's forfeiture of what its lawyer (perhaps belatedly) is pursuing now.

Not sure if he still works there. Should I contact him? or it could make it worse? I need to clarify this situation as soon as possible.

Feel free to approach him in order to clarify the matter. But make sure that you do this in writing (specifically, by email) or in a way that gets recorded so that you keep evidence of the company's allegations & conduct.

Be careful in what you commit to, and what you admit, during your interactions with company A. Keep in mind that company A could likewise use those communications as evidence with which to support its allegations.

You might also want to get acquainted with the Mexico statutes pertaining to contract. For that purpose, see articles 1792 et seq of the Civil Code of Mexico. Contract law is roughly similar in many, many countries. Gaining acquaintance with it will help you (1) know your rights when interacting with company A or its lawyer(s), and (2) sharpen your analysis of contracts (be it those proposed to you or drafted by you) in the future.

  • Next monday i'm gonna contact the company asking for my contract and dismissal papers, but still i'm not sure if those documents are gonna help to prove i don't have to pay them nothing – B.J. A.A. Aug 4 at 13:55
  • @B.J.A.A. Knowing that essential information is always likelier to help identifying and proving the merits of our legal position. – Iñaki Viggers Aug 4 at 14:17
  • Talked to a lawyer today, that company is a scam – B.J. A.A. Aug 6 at 20:19
  • @B.J.A.A. I wouldn't doubt it. Anyway, if you are ok with this answer, please mark it as accepted. That will prevent the automated user ("Community") from removing the post upon certain conditions being met (for starters, notice how 4 people quickly voted to close your question; one more VTC would have prevented me from addressing your inquiry). This post might help other users from Mexico who find themselves trapped in a contract dispute in the future. – Iñaki Viggers Aug 6 at 20:35

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.