1

A few days ago I got to know a person on a social network. We had a few days of innocuous conversations on WhatsApp, but then they started becoming intrusive and imposing and didn't respect my time. After I hadn't been replying for a few hours they started telling me off and accusing me. I had enough and blocked them.

The thing is, they are disabled and obviously are having some psychological problems. Now another person which introduced themselves as their partner is writing to me that it wasn't nice of me, they have gone through so much suffering recently and I have to be understanding and all.

Given the emotional instability of my former online friend, if something happens to them, can I, in theory, become subject to legal prosecution? I didn't offend them and never said a wrong word, I just respect my time and don't want to talk to people who don't respect me. This all is very disturbing.

UPDATE: the person is from the US, and I'm from Ukraine

  • 3
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it belongs on interpersonal.stackexchange.com – BlueDogRanch Aug 27 '19 at 13:58
  • 2
    @BlueDogRanch I'm asking about LEGAL ASPECTS, not whether it's ethical or moral. – olegst Aug 27 '19 at 13:59
  • 1
    In theory yes, absolutely. In a theoretical jurisdiction where ignoring a person online is a crime. To get some useful answers you need to specify where you and the person are. – Greendrake Aug 27 '19 at 14:03
  • @Greendrake fixed – olegst Aug 27 '19 at 14:05
6

The First Amendement of the United States Constitution protects the right of an individual's freedom of association from government interference as one of the five protections in the First Amendment. Association generally means your ability to keep your own company, be it friendship, business associations, romantic partners, and online buddies. There is no criminal liability for not having an association with someone and I would be weary that the second person who contacted you is not necessarily who they say you are. While there is a case of possible illegality in which a girl's interaction led to her boyfriend's suicide, this was an active case of egging on the boy's suicide while she was aware of his suicidal state of mind and the case is currently being appealed on the grounds of violating the girl's first amendment right to Free Speech and is hardly case law for the entire nation as a whole.

Not legal advice, but block the partner of the guy you blocked and anyone claiming any association with the guy. Assume it's all the same guy.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.