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A company is advertising a product on Google for $44. However, after going to their website, I found that the product is $130.

After contacting them, they said in the TOS they state this:

Product Pricing: All prices are subject to change without notice, and may make changes to any products or services offered at the Store, or to the applicable prices for any such products or services, at any time, without notice.

Are they meant to change the advertisment to the real value after changing the price?

  • I would send them a reply with support.google.com/merchants/topic/… and state that you plan on informing google of the violations. As someone who deals with google shopping, they get really mad about price changes like that. – Jdahern Oct 15 '15 at 17:47
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If the business is displaying multiple pricing and if they or you are in Australia then the Australian consumer law says:

  • the business must withdraw the product or service from sale until the multiple pricing problem is fixed,
  • if you choose an item or service that has multiple different prices displayed or advertised and the business can’t withdraw the product or service from sale and fix the error, you are entitled to buy it for the lowest price.

In addition, the law prohibits them from making misleading claims - their terms of service march dangerously close to that line.

Depending exactly how they handle this may put them on the wrong side of the law:

  1. If you draw their attention to this and they refuse to sell you the product at any price until they fix the Google price, then this is legal.
  2. If you draw their attention to this and they do or would sell it to you for the higher price before they fixed the Google price, then this is illegal.
  3. If you draw their attention to this and they do or would sell it to you for the lowest price before they fixed the Google price, then this is legal.

Of course, if they are a foreign retailer you may have difficulty in making them comply with Australian law even though they are obliged to.

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    Out of curiosity, would this apply if the price was scraped by Google, rather than provided by the store? – cpast Oct 15 '15 at 1:14
  • @cpast so, if it were an obsolete price? I think they would be ok: I can't hold you to the price in last weeks newspaper. – Dale M Oct 15 '15 at 4:09
  • @DaleM Thanks for that, I thought they would comply with Australian law as the advertisement is targeting buyers from their AU warehouse. I spoke to them again and they just kept on showing me a picture saying "We reserve the right to change price without notice" – the133448 Oct 15 '15 at 12:34
  • @DaleMThis is what they just told me "10:43:33 PM Yes, the google shows that advertisement even it is already long gone or finished" Full Convo - pastebin.com/sq6vS4CA – the133448 Oct 15 '15 at 12:52

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