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I have been given a NDA which say it is "unilaterally non-terminable for an indefinite period of time".

Is this legal? Can they enforce me to keep the NDA forever?

They also said that "The contractor take on no liability for the correctness, reliability and completeness of confidential information".

Does this means that if some information is leaked, I could be blamed for it, even after I quit the company?

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Is this legal?

Yes

Can they enforce me to keep the NDA forever?

No, it ends when you die. Practically, of course, any confidential information you have becomes less useful over time either because it becomes non-confidential or it just goes out of date.

They also said that "The contractor take on no liability for the correctness, reliability and completeness of confidential information".

Don’t know what this means without knowing if it’s you or them who is “the contractor”. Also, more context is probably required.

Does this means that if some information is leaked, I could be blamed for it, even after I quit the company?

If you leak it, of course. Otherwise you could quit on Monday and publish on Tuesday.

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  • "Don’t know what this means without knowing if it’s you or them who is “the contractor”. Also, more context is probably required." I am the contracting party, so, from what I get, is that if something gets leaked, and it's their fault, I can't take actions to defend myself. They also say that I have to compensate them economically if the NDA is breached. I'm not planning on breaching the contract, but also don't want to be find guilty in the case that something happens, that my superior didn't prevent, and take the blame in their place. – Javier Bullrich Feb 11 at 10:45
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    Is this statement in context of disclosing confidential information in the text? Otherwise it would mean you aren't liable if they tell you something that is wrong and you act on it. – Tiger Guy Feb 11 at 18:06

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