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Do the two that-clauses below bewilder you too? How can they be rewritten more basically?

  1. 1 flummoxes me as it contains 2 "opinion"s. But I grasp that "opinion is held on reasonable grounds" modifies, and thus is the, "false statement of fact".

  2. 2 flummoxes me as it contains 2 "intention"s. I grasp that

a false statement of fact that intention/opinion is actually held = You don't actually hold that intention/opinion.

But what the heck does it mean to intend a false statement of fact that intention (opinion) is actually held?

Richard and Damian Taylor. Contract Law Directions (6 edn 2019). p. 180.

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  • I would point out that the two that's here do not have the same grammatical function. – phoog Feb 18 at 17:41
  • I may have been writing about the two thats in "a false statement of fact that intention/opinion is actually held = You don't actually hold that intention/opinion," which I now suspect are not the two thats you're asking about. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/That. The first that is a complementizer while the second is a demonstrative adjective. – phoog Apr 23 at 22:45
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    As to the thats in the question title, the second and fourth are similarly complementizers, while the first and third are relativizers; there seems to be controversy as to how that should be analyzed in such a construction, but whatever you call it, it is introducing the relative clause that describes the intention (in the first case) or opinion (in the second). – phoog Apr 23 at 22:49
1

How can they be rewritten more basically?

  1. The opinion conveys (although not necessarily in an explicit way) fictitious grounds in order to give the false impression of being supported by the facts.

  2. The actual intention differs from the expressed one.

what the heck does it mean to intend a false statement of fact that intention (opinion) is actually held?

It means that the person tries to [mis-]lead others to think that that he has the intention at issue although he does not actually have that intention.

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