1

Assume that:

  1. the appellant has little or no income and money.

  2. the case's legal fees have already been significant; the appellant has already undergone a trial, and likely the County Court and EWHC.

  3. the claim for damages costs less than the legal fees, or the claim itself is not monetary.

    1. barristers (and/or solicitors) were instructed, possibly expensive QCs. It is unclear whether they were acting pro bono.

The official judgements do not reveal the funding for these lawyers; so where can I find this information? Please advise if there are cases that better match the assumptions above:

  1. R (on the application of Tigere) (Appellant) v Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (Respondent) [2015] UKSC 57

The appellant needed student loans, and so how could she have funded litigation in the EWHC and then EWCA before the UKSC?

  1. R (on the application of Reilly and another) (Respondents) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (Appellant) [2013] UKSC 68
3

The official judgements do not reveal the funding for these lawyers; so where can I find this information?

Nowhere. The commercial arrangements between lawyers and their clients are private and confidential like any other business transactions. You have no more right to know this then you do to know how your neighbour pays their mortgage.

how could she have funded litigation in the EWHC and then EWCA before the UKSC?

She may have rich parents or another benefactor who has in interest in her or the outcome of the case. She may have won the lottery. She may be the heiress of a dead rich uncle.

By the way, "having" student loans does not mean you "need" student loans. Interest rates on student loans are cheap - if I need to pay $10,000 for a course and have $10,000 earning 5%, I would be nuts to use that if I could take out a loan at 3%.

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