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So when I die I want my friend to keep my body parts in a jars and maybe make a mask out of my face or some thing like that. Can I do that? I’m only 17 so idk if my parents would have a say or if a will would even work for me being in parental control. Anyways thanks

  • I sincerely hope that you live long enough that the under 18 question is moot, by a lot. – Damila May 22 at 1:24
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It depends on where you live. In Washington, RCW 68.50.110 requires that

Except in cases of dissection provided for in RCW 68.50.100, and where human remains are rightfully carried through or removed from the state for the purpose of burial elsewhere, human remains lying within this state, and the remains of any dissected body, after dissection, must be decently buried, undergo cremation, alkaline hydrolysis, or natural organic reduction within a reasonable time after death.

Per RCW 68.50.130,

Every person who performs a disposition of any human remains, except as otherwise provided by law, in any place, except in a cemetery or a building dedicated exclusively for religious purposes, is guilty of a misdemeanor. Disposition of human remains following cremation, alkaline hydrolysis, or natural organic reduction may also occur on private property, with the consent of the property owner; and on public or government lands or waters with the approval of the government agency that has either jurisdiction or control, or both, of the lands or waters.

So cutting the body up and sticking the bits in a jar is illegal, but cremating or dissolving it and keeping the remains in a jar is legal.

As for parental permission, RCW 68.50.160 says that

A person has the right to control the disposition of his or her own remains without the predeath or postdeath consent of another person. A valid written document expressing the decedent's wishes regarding the place or method of disposition of his or her remains, signed by the decedent in the presence of a witness, is sufficient legal authorization for the procedures to be accomplished.

It does not require that the person be an adult.

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