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Thank you for considering my question. There is a criminal who has been tried in court and proven guilty and received sentences for a series of crimes including threat to kill and withdrawing money from accounts illegally. He has managed to escape from Iran to Canada legally with a work permit and also transfer the money he stole to Canada. Googling this case has no result since there is no treaty between the two countries. But I am sure there must be some way to bring the criminal back to justice. Especially because as long as he feels safe in Canada and is sure he will not be extradited, lives are in danger here (He pays people here to do the job for him).

I am no lawyer, but as a citizen who has been involved in the issue for over a year, these are the only course of actions coming to my mind:

  • Contact the immigration authorities to prevent him from obtaining citizenship of Canada and extending the visa.
  • Try to contact the Canadian prosecutor and ask them to consider this case. Even though there is no treaty between the two countries, I believe it does not mean Canada wants to host dangerous Criminals and help them escape justice and the prosecutor might be willing to investigate at least.

Am I thinking correctly? Any other suggestions?

Please consider that hiring a lawyer who is willing to charge me BEFORE I get my money back from this criminal (which is quite a considerable amount of money, well, basically, my whole 20 years of work savings!!), cannot be an option for me. Of course after I have my hand on my money, I am willing to pay all the expenses.

Thanks every one in advance.

  • This is not a job for you. It is a job for police authorities. Give them the information you have and let them do it, and accept that quite likely nothing can or will be done. – Nij Jun 2 at 9:05
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    Canada is not going to extradite him but they may deport him if he committed any immigration fraud. Typically applications for Visa or Work Permit include many question on your history including "have you ever been convicted for a crime". So either he lied on the application or the Canada didn't care about his criminal record. If he lied, you may have a lever: contact the immigration fraud department canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/… – Hilmar Jun 2 at 12:25
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    @Hilmar, your comment should be an answer, and I believe it is the "right" one, in that it's the only approach that I could imagine having effect. It's possible that this person disclosed their conviction and presented it as being political persecution, which is likely being investigated. And if the poster has evidence to back up the hinted-at claim that this person is hiring people currently to commit crimes in Canada, then this should be presented to Canadian police, or Crimestoppers. – CCTO Jun 2 at 19:32
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    I don't think the divorce matters much in Canada directly. It may matter indirectly: If the application asks "are you married" and he answered "no", then he has lied on the application. Immigration law is VERY complicated and nuanced, you may need professional help. They could look at the specific conditions of his work permit or visa and also check out the sponsor. – Hilmar Jun 7 at 11:45
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    You may not need to travel to get things started. Immigration lawyers are used to working internationally. You could try to find one in your own country, in Canada or a "neutral" country. and start communication by phone or e-mail. Unfortunately there is no Canadian embassy or consulate in Iran. I believe this is handled from Turkey but you could try to contact them as well. travel.gc.ca/assistance/embassies-consulates/iran – Hilmar Jun 8 at 13:21
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Promoting the comment to an answer based on the feedback.

Canada is not going to extradite him but they may deport him if he committed any immigration fraud. Typically applications for Visa or Work Permit include many question on your history including "have you ever been convicted for a crime".

So either he lied on the application or the Canada didn't care about his criminal record. If he lied, you may have a lever: contact the immigration fraud department https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/protect-fraud/report-fraud.html

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It relies upon the cooperation of Canada

This is not likely.

In the absence of an extradition treaty, extradition is at the discretion of the host country. Canada, rightly or wrongly, does not see Iran’s judicial system as free, fair and impartial and, as such, they will generally not accept an Iranian court’s verdict as evidence of guilt. An example.

The chance of Canada agreeing to an extradition is minuscule. Your chance of ever seeing the money you lost again is, unfortunately, also minuscule. Your efforts would be better rewarded in earning money again and writing off what you’ve lost.

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  • Thank you for your answer. I should clarify that Iranian judiciary system is almost only corrupted when it comes to political cases. In fact I myself am pretty surprised how fair, just and descent the other parts of the judiciary system works. However, I can had over the whole documents and evidence to the Canadian judiciary system so they can assess and analyse everything themselves. Moreover, we are not talking about one or two years of savings, we are talking about a lifetime of hard work, saving and investment. So do not ask me to give up easily my friend. – Gholi Jun 4 at 14:14
  • I should also mention that even deportation is a good option for me. It might encourage him to start a negotiation. – Gholi Jun 4 at 14:18
  • @Gholi: The actual corruption of Iran's judiciary is irrelevant: what matters is Canada's perception of it (and that's before political concerns and optics come into play). – sharur Jun 4 at 17:09
  • @sharur then what do you suggest I should do to have my hands back on my money. – Gholi Jun 4 at 17:13
  • It is also worth mentioning a very complicated case which you might find helpful: This guy, my ex, registered a divorce illegally! So, basically I can invalidate that. Will that do any good? Like he will have to split the belongings in Canada? Any ideas? – Gholi Jun 4 at 17:20

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