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When legal personnel write letters on behalf of their clients, they often include a sentence saying "Our client reserves all rights."

There are good reasons for doing so. However, if a legally untrained person writes "I reserve all rights" (on his own behalf), it sounds like formal legalese, and may end up aggravating the other side's emotions.

Is there a way of rephrasing the sentence that preserves the meaning while not letting the situation get too emotionally charged?

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Is there a way of rephrasing the sentence that preserves the meaning while not letting the situation get too emotionally charged?

In most contexts a phrase like "Our client reserves all rights" is verbose because the person who "reserves all rights" obviously would not issue a demand letter with the intent to waive the rights he is actually pursuing via that letter.

That being said, an alternative wording is that "xyz shall not be construed as the person's waiver of his rights". A comparison of the emotional impact of each wording is unclear and too subjective, though, since "I reserve all rights" in and of itself does not really sound intimidating, aggressive, or emotionally charged in the first place.

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