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I am looking for free access databases that can be used to search docket information and case law search. I came across. https://www.docketalarm.com/ but, I could'nt find the docket information of case.

I am aware of paid data bases like Lexmachina/ westlaw but I am looking for free database, Are there any freely accessible data bases for searching docket information.

My target is US jurisdiction.

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  • Case law is jurisdiction-specific. Did you have a jurisdiction in mind? – eleventyone Jul 22 '20 at 9:29
  • I am looking for US cases – RishiM Jul 22 '20 at 9:33
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Try courtlistener.com and Leagle.com . The former allows for operators (giving thus the ability to fine-tune your search) and also shows the documents filed by the parties whereas leagle.com only fetches court decisions/opinions.

When searching for court opinions it is recommendable to use multiple resources rather than sticking to only one. For a while I used LexisNexis only. Its search flexibility is comparable to that of courtlistener and I was comfortable with its syntax. But several months later I realized that LexisNexis was not fetching some important authorities (case law) I needed. That prompted me to switch to Leagle, and its results gave me some heads-up for retrieving from LexisNexis certain decisions which Leagle was not fetching.

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  • Thanks @Iñaki Viggers I tried fetch the results in court listener for a case that has been filed 6M back there was no judgment yet, only trail scheduling orders. i couldn't even find the case in courtlistener. Does courtlister updates the dockets on daily bases? . – RishiM Jul 23 '20 at 11:21
  • @RishiM It is very possible that the site database updates on a daily basis. Maybe the court where that case was filed is not tracked by the site. For instance, if the case has been filed in some county court (i.e., state, not federal court), it will not be tracked by the website unless the ruling(s) is (are) appealed. Since the case was filed 6 months ago and there is no judgment on it, the chances that it has been taken to an appellate court are basically zero. – Iñaki Viggers Jul 23 '20 at 12:27

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