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If I am the registrar of the website domain name, meanwhile the website/business is running and registered in another country, who is obliged to pay taxes for the income of business, me as registrar of domain or the owner who runs the website/business in their country?

I tried to do a research but I didn't found any answer to this specific question. Would be happy if I have your help here. Thanks in advance

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Do I have to pay taxes if I register the domain but the website income belongs to someone else?

No. The person or company who runs, and/or profits from, the business is the entity under obligation to pay all the applicable taxes: Value Added Tax, income tax, corporate tax, and so forth.

Unless you charge a significant amount therefor (see the comments), the mere registration of just one domain is unlikely to trigger tax obligations.

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  • Logically, "registering a domain" seems very much like "providing a service." Wouldn't the registrar to charge for taking this action? – DavidSupportsMonica Jul 25 at 23:24
  • @DavidSupportsMonica "Wouldn't the registrar to charge for taking this action?" Even if he does charge for that one-time event, the amount is unlikely to meet the statutory threshold for tax filings. To the tax authority this amount would be negligible compared to the ongoing income of the entity who runs the actual business. – Iñaki Viggers Jul 26 at 0:08
  • Yes, that'd be so. But I suspect that registrars don't work for free. My cavil is that their activity is taxable, and would generate a tax liability if it aggregates to meet the statutory threshold. I think the final sentence of your answer is not correct: the registrar does provide a service, and doing so is a taxable activity that may generate a tax liability. – DavidSupportsMonica Jul 26 at 0:28
  • @DavidSupportsMonica I hear you. I got the impression that the OP was referring to only one transaction (which in and of itself is not meaningful for tax purposes), although admittedly the OP's post is inconclusive in that regard. To avoid confusion I edited the answer. – Iñaki Viggers Jul 26 at 12:09
  • Thanks. I think that's more correct. – DavidSupportsMonica Jul 26 at 15:05

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