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Federal and State governments require businesses to post labor law notices where employees can see them. Failing to do so can result in fines.

I run a small business - a single-member LLC - from my home. Do I really have to post labor law signage in my home for the only employee (myself)?

If more background is needed, this I do IT consulting and web design. I have some sub-contractors, but they also work from their homes. I understand in their cases, I can send them the posters in digital form. But what about for myself?

  • What state are you referring to? – Pat W. Nov 28 '15 at 15:34
  • My business is based in Ohio – Moses Nov 28 '15 at 15:35
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    One factor in this special case is that there ARE NO employees at the site. Only partners/owners. – dwoz Nov 28 '15 at 20:28
  • Exactly. There aren't any employees at all, just me the owner. According to the helpful federal websites, that eliminates many of the posters from needing to be displayed because I'm not an "employer", correct? – Moses Nov 28 '15 at 23:26
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The spirit of the law would imply digesting the info and appropriately retaining the documents for your reference. The letter of the law would imply posting. Labor law postings are a great example of a "rule" (rather than a more forgiving "standard"): it works well in general but has odd consequences in certain situations. This is one of those situations.

I couldn't find an instance where the courts dealt with the manner of posting for a home-based, single-member LLC. We'd surmise this is because regulators probably aren't interested in committing scarce resources to enforcement of fringe cases where a single-owner has complied with the spirit of a law whose text doesn't address the situation particularly well.

J.J. Keller's FAQ suggests that for home-based employees, you can attempt to show a "good faith" effort by either sending posters (maybe you print and file them) or making them available for reference electronically.

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