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European Union law secures EU Citizens' right to travel in the member countries freely. They can also bring their non-EU family member(s) with them in certain instances.

This page mentions that:

Permanent residence These Regulations also introduced a right of permanent residence for EEA nationals and their family members after a five-year period of uninterrupted legal residence in the State.

While this page mentions that:

Adult application based on residence for UK, EU/EEA & Swiss nationals

To apply for citizenship by naturalisation based on residence, you must prove that you have been resident in the State for at least 5 years (1825 or 1826 days) out of the last 9 years.

This includes 1 year (365 or 366 days) of continuous residence immediately before the date you apply.


Now does it mean that after 5 years of residence in Ireland, I (EU national) and my non-EU family members should apply for PERMANENT RESIDENCE OR IRISH CITIZENSHIP?

I am confused.

EDIT: Several informal sources also mention that Irish PR can be obtained after 5 years of residence (be it through employment, investment etc..). But one of the naturalization requirements is 5 years of residence. Why would one apply for PR when they can apply for Irish citizenship after 5 years of residence? Does Ireland have a concept of a PR like the UK's ILR or the American Green Card anyway? So many sources have puzzled me completely:(

DO NOTE THAT IRISH PR IS NOT A REQUIREMENT FOR NATURALIZATION. THERE IS JUST THIS CONTINUOUS 5 YEAR RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT, BESIDES OTHER THINGS.

  • @phoog Any idea about this one? – Jay Shah Aug 5 at 8:13
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    Ah, the pinging doesn't work except in response, so I did not see this before now. Mark Johnson's answer is basically correct, though there are conditions that may be imposed, for example with regard to the uninterrupted nature of the period of residence. – phoog Aug 5 at 13:21
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Now does it mean that after 5 years of residence in Ireland, I (EU national) and my non-EU family members should apply for PERMANENT RESIDENCE OR IRISH CITIZENSHIP?

It seems to mean that you may each choose one option or the other.

Why would one apply for PR when they can apply for Irish citizenship after 5 years of residence?

One possibility: the current citizenship would be lost by naturalizing, and the person does not wish to lose it. There could be other reasons for preferring one or the other, of course.

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As an EU Citizen (and your EU family members), you are automatically a permanent resident after 5 years.

You can apply for a permanent resident card to document this.

Such a card would document the fact that you fulfill the 5 years required for naturalization, should you wish to also become an Irish citizen.


Sources:

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    @JayShah I wrote can not must. It will assist you in the proof you need, but you are not required to apply for the card. For naturalization you must bring proof one way or another. – Mark Johnson Aug 5 at 10:23
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    @JayShah Yes. In countries that have national ID cards, such a card is useful, but in Ireland probably less so. – Mark Johnson Aug 5 at 10:28
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    @JayShah Your non eu family members would then get an Article 20 card instead of the present Article 10 card. – Mark Johnson Aug 5 at 10:31
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    @JayShah to be precise, only certain family relationships qualify under the free movement directive. – phoog Aug 5 at 13:25
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    @JayShah You should assume the dictionary definition of DEPENDENT | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary: needing the support of something or someone in order to continue existing or operating. – Mark Johnson Aug 5 at 18:09

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