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Concentrate Criminal Law (2020 7 edn). p 61. I copied and pasted s 18 for your convenience.

Whosoever shall unlawfully and maliciously by any means whatsoever wound or cause any grievous bodily harm to any person, . . . F1 with intent, . . . F1 to do some . . . F1 grievous bodily harm to any person, or with intent to resist or prevent the lawful apprehension or detainer of any person, shall be guilty [Author omitted remainder.]

How did the author deduce his ways 2 and 4?
s 18 states the adverb "maliciously", not the adjective "malicious" used by the author. In other words, s 18 doesn't qualify "intent" with any adjective. "maliciously" appears to qualify "wound or cause any grievous bodily harm".

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How did the author deduce his ways 2 and 4?

The adverb "maliciously" in Section 18 qualifies both of the offender's possible purposes: to do GBH to any person, or to resist or prevent his lawful detainment.

The author did not include "malicious" in alternatives 1 and 3 presumably because the notion of GBH itself has a connotation of malice, and thus adding "maliciously" would be redundant. By contrast, the purpose of avoiding arrest does not necessarily involve (let alone imply) a malicious intent toward the officer(s) trying to detain the offender.

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