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Suppose a software developer wants to release a software project into the public domain. However the developer knows that this sometimes causes more troubles than it solves due to the problem that public domain isn't an international thing. Can such a developer use the license below which is pretty much a public domain dedication with a zero-bsd fallback.

I want to know how this looks from a legal point of you in both international and national (commonwealth law).

This is free and unencumbered software released into the public domain.

If the above public domain dedication is legally void, the following copyright license shall apply:

Copyright (c) 2020 MY NAME email@example.com

Permission to use, copy, modify, and/or distribute this software for any purpose with or without fee is hereby granted.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND THE AUTHOR DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES WITH REGARD TO THIS SOFTWARE INCLUDING ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, DIRECT, INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM LOSS OF USE, DATA OR PROFITS, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS ACTION, ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.

  • In what case would public domain not apply yet copyright still be an issue? – Studoku Nov 18 '20 at 15:30
  • @Studoku Some jurisdictions do not recognize a work enterign the public domain other than by operation of law, such as the expiration of copyright. As far as I can see, under US law for example, there is no way for a copyright holder to simply declare a work to be in the public domain. The copyright holder remains the holder. – David Siegel Nov 18 '20 at 15:44
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The above license seems to accomplish the purpose of releasing software with no effective retention of rights.

However, Creative Commons has created the CC0 license for exactly this purpose, and its language has been vetted by a good many people. A developer might well prefer to use this more widely accepted and understood solution, instead of an unknown text.

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