7

I have read that a Turkish MP has publicized that Sarin gas has been sent through Turkey to Syria, and that he is now wanted for treason.

I am from Germany, and in our law, it is treason ("Landesverrat") if you leak state secrets to the enemy or the public, with the intent to harm the F.R.G. or to benefit a foreign power.

Telling outright lies is not punishable under that law.

Now if I understand correctly, the allegations of that Turkish MP are vague and would have been plausibly deniable, which they are no longer if the Turkish head of state orders an investigation for treason as per the German definition of "Landesverrat".

Is the assumption correct that by ordering a treason investigation, Erdogan has given away that the story is true? Or what other "kinds" of treason are there in Turkey, that may allow for plausible deniability despite an investigation?

6
  • 1
    @Mowzer Thanks for creating the correct tag, I wasn't allowed to do it. Would you mind to add a new "treason" tag? Looking at the populist and openly anti-democratic politicians that get elected around the world, I guess we could see it used more often in the future.
    – Alexander
    Commented Dec 17, 2015 at 9:33
  • No problem. And good point. Commented Dec 17, 2015 at 9:36
  • 1
    Sent through Turkey by the government? Or with its knowledge or consent?
    – phoog
    Commented Dec 18, 2015 at 5:27
  • 1
    @phoog Well, if the gas was sent through Turkey without knowledge of the government, it couldn't be a state secret. And whether they can still accuse that MP of treason if it wasn't a state secret - well, that's exactly what I'm asking.
    – Alexander
    Commented Dec 18, 2015 at 7:30
  • 2
    @Alexander I was imagining that such a statement might be seen as impugning the competence of the Turkish government. That is, assuming the act is attributed to criminal smugglers, I thought the government might take the statement as a criticism of its failure to detect or stop the smuggling. The idea that such criticism could be treasonous is frightening, but I thought that this might be the point of your question.
    – phoog
    Commented Dec 18, 2015 at 18:07

1 Answer 1

1

In Turkey, treason is considered to be an act that threatens the security of the state and the integrity of the nation. According to the Turkish Penal Code, there are several types of treason, including:

  • Espionage: The act of obtaining, disclosing, or using state secrets or classified information with the intention of harming the state or benefiting a foreign power.

  • High treason: This includes acts such as rebellion, sedition, and plotting against the state.

  • Seditious propaganda: The act of spreading false or misleading information that threatens the stability of the state or the nation.

  • Collaborating with the enemy: This includes acts such as providing aid or comfort to an enemy during war or conflict.

In the case of the Turkish MP who claimed that Sarin gas was sent through Turkey to Syria, he may be charged with treason for spreading false information or for disclosing state secrets, if the allegations are proven to be true.

However, it is important to note that in Turkey, the government has been accused of using treason charges as a means of suppressing political opposition and limiting freedom of expression. In recent years, there have been several high-profile cases where journalists, academics, and opposition politicians have been arrested and charged with treason based on their speech or political activities.

It is difficult to say whether the treason investigation into the Turkish MP is based on credible evidence or if it is a politically motivated action. The exact nature of the treason charge will depend on the specific facts and circumstances of the case.

In conclusion, treason in Turkey is a serious crime that can have serious consequences, including imprisonment and loss of citizenship. It is important to understand the different types of treason and the laws surrounding treason in Turkey in order to avoid any potential legal trouble.

P.S. The provisions regarding treason in the Turkish Penal Code can be found in the following articles:

  • Espionage: Article 330 of the Turkish Penal Code outlines the crime of espionage and provides for a sentence of up to life imprisonment for individuals who obtain, disclose, or use state secrets or classified information with the intention of harming the state or benefiting a foreign power.

  • High treason: Article 311 of the Turkish Penal Code outlines the crime of high treason and provides for a sentence of up to life imprisonment for individuals who engage in acts such as rebellion, sedition, and plotting against the state.

  • Seditious propaganda: Article 312 of the Turkish Penal Code outlines the crime of seditious propaganda and provides for a sentence of up to ten years imprisonment for individuals who spread false or misleading information that threatens the stability of the state or the nation.

  • Collaborating with the enemy: Article 312/2 of the Turkish Penal Code outlines the crime of collaborating with the enemy and provides for a sentence of up to life imprisonment for individuals who provide aid or comfort to an enemy during war or conflict.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .