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If someone from a network of an user is conducting a DDOS attack on a website they will probably block the network. If the user spams a business's server they may be blocked from the email of the business. Thus they may not be able to exercise their rights temporarily. Will the business be fined? If a business has multiple forms so that user can use the other if one if not working is it ok? Lastly the home jurisdiction of the business is India where there seems to be a section in the IT Act that holds liable the person performing the attack for damages. Can that be applied?

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The CCPA is contained in TITLE 1.81.5. California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018

Section 1798.100 (e) provides that:

) A business that collects a consumer’s personal information shall implement reasonable security procedures and practices appropriate to the nature of the personal information to protect the personal information from unauthorized or illegal access, destruction, use, modification, or disclosure in accordance with Section 1798.81.5.

Taking precautions to limit spamming seems to fall within this subsection.

Section 1798.105 (c) (1) provides that:

A business that receives a verifiable consumer request from a consumer to delete the consumer’s personal information pursuant to subdivision (a) of this section shall delete the consumer’s personal information from its records, notify any service providers or contractors to delete the consumer’s personal information from their records, and notify all third parties to whom the business has sold or shared the personal information to delete the consumer’s personal information unless this proves impossible or involves disproportionate effort. (emphasis added)

If spamming from the user makes compliance impossible or overly burdensome, this provision seems to apply. Notice also that a verified request is needed to trigger a deletion request. Ifg a request cannot be verified, it can safely be ignored.

Section 1798.105 (d) provides that:

A business, or a service provider or contractor acting pursuant to its contract with the business, another service provider, or another contractor, shall not be required to comply with a consumer’s request to delete the consumer’s personal information if it is reasonably necessary for the business, service provider, or contractor to maintain the consumer’s personal information in order to: ... (2) Help to ensure security and integrity to the extent the use of the consumer’s personal information is reasonably necessary and proportionate for those purposes.

Retention of info that identifies a spammer m,ay be needed for security purposes.

Section 1798.106 (c) provides that:

A business that receives a verifiable consumer request to correct inaccurate personal information shall use commercially reasonable efforts to correct the inaccurate personal information as directed by the consumer, pursuant to Section 1798.130 and regulations adopted pursuant to paragraph (8) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185.

Only "commercially reasonable efforts" are required.

Section 1798.110 (b) provides that:

A business that collects personal information about a consumer shall disclose to the consumer, pursuant to subparagraph (B) of paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.130, the information specified in subdivision (a) upon receipt of a verifiable consumer request from the consumer, provided that a business shall be deemed to be in compliance with paragraphs (1) to (4), inclusive, of subdivision (a) to the extent that the categories of information and the business or commercial purpose for collecting, selling, or sharing personal information it would be required to disclose to the consumer pursuant to paragraphs (1) to (4), inclusive, of subdivision (a) is the same as the information it has disclosed pursuant to paragraphs (1) to (4), inclusive, of subdivision (c).

So pre-disclosing the kinds of info collected suffices for this right, and a separate response may no0tr be needed. And again, note that consumer request6s must be verifiable.

Section 1798.130 provides:

(a) In order to comply with Sections 1798.100, 1798.105, 1798.106, 1798.110, 1798.115, and 1798.125, a business shall, in a form that is reasonably accessible to consumers:

(a) (1) (A) Make available to consumers two or more designated methods for submitting requests for information required to be disclosed pursuant to Sections 1798.110 and 1798.115, or requests for deletion or correction pursuant to Sections 1798.105 and 1798.106, respectively, including, at a minimum, a toll-free telephone number. A business that operates exclusively online and has a direct relationship with a consumer from whom it collects personal information shall only be required to provide an email address for submitting requests for information required to be disclosed pursuant to Sections 1798.110 and 1798.115, or for requests for deletion or correction pursuant to Sections 1798.105 and 1798.106, respectively.

(a) (1) (B) If the business maintains an internet website, make the internet website available to consumers to submit requests for information required to be disclosed pursuant to Sections 1798.110 and 1798.115, or requests for deletion or correction pursuant to Sections 1798.105 and 1798.106, respectively.

(a) (2) (A) Disclose and deliver the required information to a consumer free of charge, correct inaccurate personal information, or delete a consumer’s personal information, based on the consumer’s request, within 45 days of receiving a verifiable consumer request from the consumer. The business shall promptly take steps to determine whether the request is a verifiable consumer request, but this shall not extend the business’s duty to disclose and deliver the information, to correct inaccurate personal information, or to delete personal information within 45 days of receipt of the consumer’s request. The time period to provide the required information, to correct inaccurate personal information, or to delete personal information may be extended once by an additional 45 days when reasonably necessary, provided the consumer is provided notice of the extension within the first 45-day period. The disclosure of the required information shall be made in writing and delivered through the consumer’s account with the business, if the consumer maintains an account with the business, or by mail or electronically at the consumer’s option if the consumer does not maintain an account with the business, in a readily useable format that allows the consumer to transmit this information from one entity to another entity without hindrance. The business may require authentication of the consumer that is reasonable in light of the nature of the personal information requested, but shall not require the consumer to create an account with the business in order to make a verifiable consumer request provided that if the consumer, has an account with the business, the business may require the consumer to use that account to submit a verifiable consumer request.

Agsin note that requests must be verifiable.

Overall it seems that a business that makes reasonable efforts to comply is not required to use unreasonable efforts to accommodate a situation in which compliance is made impossible or burdensome by a DOS or spam attack, particularly one initiated by the same consumer. However, there is no explicit provision for this, and as yet there is little caselaw on the CCPA.

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