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My browser extensions are licensed under GPL. But GPL serves for code distribution not program usage.

As an example, this extension is licensed under GPL.

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/nosquint/

But what happens if a user sues the developer for a damage that is caused by using the extension?

Which precautions can be taken for this kind of situations? Is another explicit EULA is necessary for such free GPL licensed extensions?

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    GPL is a broad license to use software as well as a license to redistribute, subject to its "copyleft" terms. If you need legal advice about a lawsuit, you should get that from a lawyer. – hardmath Jan 7 '16 at 15:38
  • no I mean is there a precaution for such kind of possible program usage issues? how do programmers protect themselves for usage warranty and liability? – John Sewell Jan 7 '16 at 15:49
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's asking for legal advice. – Ixrec Jan 7 '16 at 19:56
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A disclaimer of warranty is integral part of GPL. I don't think you need another. Just follow the instructions for licensing under GPL, they include where you should put the disclaimer.

  • OK thanks but that section is said to refer only the code distribution. They say it does not protect for the damages caused by the usage of actual program. So I am a bit confused. – John Sewell Jan 7 '16 at 16:40
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    Where do they say it? And who they? – Jan Hudec Jan 7 '16 at 19:10
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    Section 15 "Disclaimer of Warranty" and Section 16 "Limitation of Liability" contain the default language, but these can be augmented according to Sections 7(a). – Jason Aller Jan 7 '16 at 20:21
  • @JasonAller, wikipedia says it is a license for code distribution.( GPL Wikipedia ). Software can be used even if license is not accepted. If so what happens when the user does not accept license, use anyway, damage her computer and sues? Does this mean an additional EULA is always required? – John Sewell Jan 7 '16 at 22:03
  • @JanHudec Some web resources (link1) (link2) (link3) (link4) – John Sewell Jan 7 '16 at 22:40

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