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I am currently renting a room in a 2 bedroom house. The landlord has stated she will be discontinuing internet service in July for the tenants. In the lease agreement, the water, electric, sewer, and internet service is included in the rent. I have paid the rent for 12 months (lease ends Feb 28, 2022). The internet service is one of the main reasons I rented the room. Can the landlord remove this amenity without my agreement? If I agree, can I request to be compensated for the difference in rent (without internet included)?

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  • Laws vary around the world, so which jurisdiction (country, province, state, principality etc) are you in?
    – Rick
    Jun 8 at 12:18
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Can the landlord remove this amenity without my agreement?

At the outset, no. However, make sure that the current agreement does not contain language entitling the landlord to discretion on the matter.

If I agree, can I request to be compensated for the difference in rent (without internet included)?

Not in that order. If you agree first, the landlord will have no incentive to compensate you for the concession you made.

A more sound approach is to tell the landlord something akin to "in order for me to agree, you need to adjust the rent accordingly" (or whatever concession you would require in exchange). It is in your best interest to ensure that this type of communications/matters/agreements always be in writing.

The internet service is one of the main reasons I rented the room.

If you can prove this, you might want to argue in terms akin to Restatement (Second) of Contracts at § 153 or the equivalent in your jurisdiction. For instance, prior to entering the agreement you might have expressed in an email (to the landlord or to a third person) that Internet service was a priority for your decision of where to rent.

That being said, beware that the existence of other main reasons for renting there tends to weaken your entitlement to void the remaining portion of the lease. In that case, your only option is to seek enforcement of the Internet service as provided in the original agreement.

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