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Can the U.S. government challenge, reverse or appeal any court decision made by the European Patent Office? Is there any official channel through which the U.S. government can challenge, reverse or appeal a court decision made by the EPO on behalf of a U.S. company?

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    Certainly not reverse. Europeans and the rest of the world have their own laws, of course. There is no reversing by outside entities. Regarding challenge and appeal, do you mean outside the procedures available to everyone else? Jun 25 '21 at 14:14
  • And the EPO Board of Appeals isn’t exactly a court. Jun 25 '21 at 14:20
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Can the U.S. government challenge, reverse or appeal any court decision made by the European Patent Office?

Not unless it has an interest in the patent itself (e.g. to a military device transferred to it by a defense contractor pursuant to a procurement contract), which would be exceedingly uncommon. Otherwise, it would lack standing. If a patent application were filed by the U.S. government, of course, possibly with co-applicants, it would have the rights of any other party.

Is there any official channel through which the U.S. government can challenge, reverse or appeal a court decision made by the EPO on behalf of a U.S. company?

The U.S. government could request that the European officials take a different approach through diplomatic channels, which isn't really a "challenge" and certainly isn't a "reversal" or "appeal." It is more akin to what a lobbyist for a private corporation could do.

In some contexts, the U.S. government could probably file an amicus brief or the equivalent.

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    Good answer. I'm not sure standing applies as broadly as you state. Anyone can file an opposition during a nine month period after the EPO notices the grant. The U.S. now has the IPR process that can invalidate a patent with no issue of standing (it is not an Article III court). I do not know if there is an EPO or European equivalent. Jun 26 '21 at 3:37
  • @GeorgeWhite The more general and probably more correct way to state the proposition would be that the U.S., when it is a non-party, doesn't have any rights that a private citizen in the U.S. general public would not have.
    – ohwilleke
    Jun 28 '21 at 23:50

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