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Let's say company A developed a technology, but didn't apply for a patent in the US. Ten years later, Company B applies for a patent for the same technology. Can company A void the patent saying there's prior art that was kept secret by them?

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No - prior art essentially means “published prior art”. If a company decides to keep something a trade secret rather trying to patent (this involves disclosure) they take a chance that someone else will independently invent and patent it. Under the 2012 AIA law in the US such a company can have limited rights to keep doing what they were doing, where they were doing it, to the extent they were doing it.

From Wikipedia

Prior art (state of the art or background art), in most systems of patent law, is constituted by all information that has been made available to the public in any form before a given date that Prior art (state of the art or background art), in most systems of patent law, is constituted by all information that has been made available to the public in any form before a given date that might be relevant to a patent's claims of originality. be relevant to a patent's claims of originality.

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    I used to work for a company that published such secrets, buried in thousand of pages of uninteresting stuff, in exactly one copy, sent for legal deposit. When someone else claimed, they were able to demonstrate public prior art, and void the patent.
    – Maxime
    Jul 18 '21 at 11:29
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    @Maxime, was it ... on display in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying ‘Beware of the Leopard. (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy)
    – John C
    Jul 18 '21 at 16:21
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    For that to work, the “legal deposit” needs to be publicly accessible. In the U.S. prior to 2012 there was no way to invalidate a patent outside of a patent infringement law suit. To get to the courtroom required the patent owner to sue or threaten to sue an infringer. Jul 18 '21 at 16:54
  • Must the publication be sufficiently detailed to allow the invention to be produced by someone skilled in the field, or would it only have to supply information sufficient to demonstrate what was being done, such as describing a sequence of process steps without detailing the parameters needed to make them sueful?
    – supercat
    Oct 4 '21 at 15:22
  • Good prior art is enabling. If it is a previous patent it is assumed enabled but that can be rebutted. Oct 4 '21 at 20:47

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